Education and Health journal Archive

Education and Health articles: complete archive

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SEARCH by Year (eg. type 2011 and all articles published in 2011 will appear). SEARCH by Volume and Issue: Volume 1 was published in 1983. Most years have 4 issues. In 2013 it is volume 31. To read all articles in vol. 31: issue 1 - type 311 etc.

Mark D. Griffiths, Rahim Benrazavi and Misha Teimouri, 2016. Parental mediation and adolescent screen time: A brief overview. Education and Health 34(3), 70-73. PDF

Paul Yau-ho Wong, Doris Pui-wah Cheng and Edith Yuk-lan Leung, 2016. Implementing Smoking Prevention Education in Early Childhood: Views from Parents and Early Childhood Educators. Education and Health 34(3), 65-69. PDF

Jennifer Fane and Samantha Schulz. 2016. 'Re'-Learning health: Challenges in teaching health literacy and implications for the new national Australian HPE curriculum. Education and Health 34(1),10-14.  PDF

 

Jane Petch. 2016. Health Promotion in Primary Schools. Education and Health 34(1),15-20.  PDF

Andrew B. Evans and David T. Evans. 2016. Do safeguarding concerns deter young people’s access to condoms? Issues about integrating sexual health services online. Education and Health 34(1),3-8.  PDF

David Regis. 2016. School nurses still do it in schools! Education and Health 34(1),21-22.  PDF

David McGeorge. 2016. Developing a free research resource to support those concerned with the health and wellbeing of children and young people. Education and Health 34(1),9.  PDF

Rebecca Jennings. 2015. Too much, Too soon?  Or Too little, Too late?  The case for Sex and Relationships Education in Primary Schools. Education and Health 33(4),107-109. PDF

Linda Cregan. 2015. School meals: the need to evaluate the impact of the investment in universal free school meals for infants. Education and Health 33(4),105-107. PDF
 
 

Sarah Kendal. 2015. Guided self-help: is it relevant to emotional wellbeing promotion in high schools? Education and Health 33(4),100-104. PDF

Jack Fletcher, Sarah Hurst, Jaime Bolzern and Jasmine Schulkind. 2015. Sexpression:UK - A new vision for comprehensive sex and relationship education. Education and Health 33(4),96-99. PDF

Jennifer Lloyd and Katrina Wyatt. 2015. Uptake, retention and engagement of children participating in the cluster randomised controlled trial of the Healthy Lifestyles Programme (HeLP). Education and Health 33(4),88-95. PDF

Mark D. Griffiths and Mike Sutton. 2015.  Screen time and crime: The Crime Substitution Hypothesis revisited. Education and Health 33(4),85-87.  PDF
 

Annette James. 2015. Unhealthy weight : Changing the attitude and behaviour of Liverpool’s children and young people. Education and Health 33(3),77-82.  PDF

 
 

Amy Booth. 2015. What do young people want from their school nursing service?  A consultation to inform service development. Education and Health 33(3),71-76.  PDF

 

Linda Aslett. 2015. Getting to Know You : an evaluation of the information-gathering process by education staff in a CAMHS Tier 4 unit. Education and Health 33(3),66-70.  PDF

 

Angela Balding and David Regis. 2015. Young People into 2015. Education and Health 33(3),63-65.  PDF

 

Jennie Aronsson, Sue Waite and Maria Tighe Clark. 2015. Measuring the impact of outdoor learning on the physical activity of school age children: The use of accelerometry. Education and Health 33(3),57-62.  PDF
 

 

Mark D Griffiths. 2015. A brief review of self-asphyxial risk-taking behaviour in adolescents. Education and Health 33(3),54-56.  PDF

David T Evans and Paul Watson. 2015. Spotlight on sexual health and education for Military, Veterans and Families. Education and Health 33(2),47-51. PDF

David Regis. 2015. Pupil voice : young people tell us about their health and wellbeing. Education and Health 33(2),43-46. PDF
 

Sarah Chapman. 2015. Teaching children in schools about sexual abuse: what do we know about how well this works? Education and Health 33(2),40-43. PDF
 

Boo Spurgeon. 2015. Student perspectives and reflections on specialist PSHE provision in secondary school Education and Health 33(2),36-39. PDF
 

Stacy Simera. 2015. Still Sleepless in America: The paradox of local control in education. Education and Health 33(2),33-35. PDF

I thought you might like hearing that Education and Health was specifically mentioned in hearings for California Senate Bill 328, a proposed bill that sets limits on how early the school day can start in the state. The bill passed the state senate, and is now moving through the assembly. Yesterday was a vital vote in the assembly education committee. Assembly member Kevin Kiley, who had previously voted no on the bill, read directly from the guest editorial I wrote for you back in 2015 on the paradox of local control "Still Sleepless in America" and cited it as the reason he changed his vote to yes, and it passed the committee yesterday, July 10th, by just one vote.

 

He speaks one hour and ten minutes in: https://www.assembly.ca.gov/media/assembly-education-committee-20190710/...
 

- Stacy Simera

 

Melonie Syrett. 2014. PSHE teaching in primary schools : The past, present and the future. Education and Health 32(2),73-77. PDF

 

 

Pages

Comments about SHEU

"We did this last year with Year 8 and 10 and was incredibly useful. It is WELL worth doing and so useful to inform PSHE planning. The safeguarding audit team were delighted that we had done it. The findings are so so interesting.
"The findings are really comprehensive and range from what percentage of year 8 have breakfast in the morning to how many have tried this particular drug, to identity, health and sleep patterns, mental health, citizenship issues....
"It's essential for the PSHE and pastoral curriculum."

PSHCEE coordinator

Any comments on specific survey questions that may have caused difficulty?
All questions are clearly worded and easy to answer

Class teacher

"The data from last time were spot-on and we have done lots of work with it. We are very keen to repeat the survey." Headteacher

Headteacher

My school took part in the Health Survey last year and found it incredibly beneficial. It has been an invaluable tool for planning our PSHE/well being provision and actioning our school development plan.

Primary School Wellbeing Lead

"The data for (us) are very useful ... This is especially important when evaluating the impact of interventions regarding alcohol or other areas, as the survey data are likely to provide an earlier indication than routine data sources."

Specialist Registrar in Public Health

"Your work in developing the Health Related Behaviour Survey was ground breaking and has continued to evolve." Tribute from a Director of Public Health to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

We were all very impressed with the spreadsheet and can see that an incredible amount of work has gone into creating this!

Health Improvement Specialist

"Every school involved in the National Healthy School programme should start with an HRBQ survey." Health Education Co-ordinator

Health Education Co-ordinator

"The data from the 2018/19 survey is still in heavy use here, the physical activity related findings were pivotal in changing the relevant strategy recently to target less active groups like girls towards the end of secondary school, and I’ve three fairly hefty jobs on the to-do list that will use the data with other sources to identify target schools for mental health and physical activity projects, and another looking at community safety. I call it the gift that keeps giving and that certainly seems to be the case!"

Senior Public Health Specialist (Intelligence)

"The Schools Health Education Unit is the jewel in the crown of the Health Education Authority." Major General Sir John Acland 1928 - 2006

Major General Sir John Acland