Education and Health journal Archive

Education and Health articles: complete archive

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SEARCH by Year (eg. type 2011 and all articles published in 2011 will appear). SEARCH by Volume and Issue: Volume 1 was published in 1983. Most years have 4 issues. In 2013 it is volume 31. To read all articles in vol. 31: issue 1 - type 311 etc.

Katja Joronen, Häkämies Annukka and Åstedt-Kurki Päivi. 2012. School-based drama, health and wellbeing: Challenges to studying its effectiveness. Education and Health 30(3),71-74. PDF

Mark D. Griffiths, Daniel L. King and Paul H. Delfabbro. 2012. Simulated gambling in video gaming: What are the implications for adolescents? Education and Health 30(3),68-70. PDF

Lisa Artis. 2012. The Sleep Council’s teaching resource: 'Better Brains with More Sleep'. Education and Health 30(3),66-67. PDF

Jane Ansell. 2012. Sound Sleep: raising awareness in schools of the importance of sleep for our emotional and physical wellbeing. Education and Health 30(3),64-65. PDF

Neralie Cain. 2012. Ready, willing, and able? Sleep hygiene education, motivational interviewing and cognitive behaviour therapy for insomnia in an Australian high school setting. Education and Health 30(3),60-63. PDF

Editorial. 2012. Sleepless in America : School start times. Education and Health 30(3),57-59. PDF

Editorial. 2012. School management of students with a lack of sleep. Education and Health 30(3),56. PDF

Louise Croft, Luis Gracia-Marco, Judy Hargadon and Richard Winsley. 2012. Should we be giving children choices about their health? Education and Health 30(4),113-115. PDF

Felicity South, Charlotte Taylor, Helena Darby, Penney Upton, Dominic Upton. 2012. What do lunchtime staff think about children's eating habits following a healthy eating intervention? Education and Health 30(4),108-112. PDF

Marewa Glover, Dudley Gentles, Leilani Clayton-Bray, Robert Scragg, Vili Nosa, Judith McCool, Chris Bullen. 2012. Stickers: A popular health promotion resource, but do they have any effect? Education and Health 30(4),103-107. PDF

Andrena Waghorn. 2012. School-based intervention supporting pupils affected by trauma, bereavement and loss: STAGES (Support, Trauma and Grief – Enabling Schools). Education and Health 30(4),99-102. PDF

Edo Shonin, William Van Gordon, and Mark D. Griffiths. 2012. The health benefits of mindfulness-based interventions for children and adolescents. Education and Health 30(4),95-98. PDF

Philip Gilligan and Martin Manby with Debra Gibson and Alison Hodgkinson. 2012. Healthy Heroes: Improving young children's lifestyles in Lancashire; an evaluation of a challenge based schools' programme. Education and Health 30(4),87-94. PDF

Stewart Attridge 2011. The Sexual Health Educator and the provision of Sex Education in Wales. Education and Health 29(3),46-50. PDF

SHEU 2011. Young People and their Health-Related Behaviour. Education and Health 29(3),58-60. PDF

Daria J. Kuss and Mark D. Griffiths 2011. Excessive online social networking: Can adolescents become addicted to Facebook?. Education and Health 29(4),68-71. PDF

Katharine Bruce 2011. Every Child Matters - Health Related Behaviour survey in North Yorkshire: a case study. Education and Health 29(4),63-67. PDF

David Regis 2011. The end of self-esteem?. Education and Health 29(4),83-84. PDF

Sarah Kendal 2011. Guided self-help: a feasible and acceptable way for schools to promote emotional wellbeing in students. Education and Health 29(3),53-57. PDF

Triece Turnbull 2011. Sex and Relationship Education in British families: How do we move forward?. Education and Health 29(2),35-37. PDF

Wayne Usher 2011. Social Media and Early 21st Century School Health Education In Australia. Education and Health 29(4),79-82. PDF

Colette Hallas 2011. Developing Student Health and Wellbeing Services in Secondary Schools. Education and Health 29(2),26-27. PDF

Neil Morris and Niall D. Galbraith 2011. Mild hypoglycaemia and educational performance. Education and Health 29(2),28-31. PDF

Neil Armstrong 2011. Children are still fit, but not active!. Education and Health 29(3),43-45. PDF

Daniel Wight 2011. The effectiveness of school-based sex education: What do rigorous evaluations in Britain tell us?. Education and Health 29(4),72-78. PDF

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Comments about SHEU

My school took part in the Health Survey last year and found it incredibly beneficial. It has been an invaluable tool for planning our PSHE/well being provision and actioning our school development plan.

Primary School Wellbeing Lead

 “The (SHEU survey) helped us to prioritise where we needed to be in terms of PSHE education. We delivered assemblies based on the evidence as well as curriculum development, and dealt with whole school issues – particularly in regard to pastoral care. The answers received to the question on the survey “Who are you most likely to approach if you needed help” worried staff as “teacher” was not a popular answer. Subsequently the staff asked themselves why this had happened and what needed to be done to address the issue. There was more emphasis on wider aspects of PSHE education delivery, which needed more attention.

To summarise, the (SHEU survey) allows the PSHE department to assess the impact of teaching and learning and modify future lessons accordingly. It allows our school to look at whole school issues such as the extent to which the pastoral care system is meeting the needs of our pupils. It helps us to do need analysis of our pupils. It helps to provide important evidence for SEF / the extent to which we are meeting wellbeing indicators / National Healthy School standards.”  

Secondary School Head

"The Schools Health Education Unit has been a unique inspiration to all of us. For me, as I have worked in the many different areas of the NHS, the SHEU, its principles and your determination have always been a cornerstone in what a health promoting service should be about."
PCT Performance Manager paying tribute to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

PCT Performance Manager

I would just like to say thank you very much to Angela, yourself and all of the SHEU team for making the [survey] so successful. The survey has been well received and we are using data in new ways to help support work on local Public Health priorities.

Senior Public Health Specialist

"Just to say a huge thank you for all your efforts in helping us with the Health survey amongst pupils. It has provided us with significant data which will be used across the school to help us improve. It helped us to obtain a healthy schools standard as well. I hope we can make this an annual feature as we can track the changing health of our pupils." Headteacher

Headteacher

"We use the data to inform whole school practice: Pastoral programmes for target groups of pupils; Items for discussion with School Council; Information to help us achieve the Healthy School gold standard; To develop and dicuss with pupils our Anti-Bullying Policy; Targeted whole class sessions with the Police Community Support Officers; To share pupil perceptions of all aspects of their school life with parents, staff and governers." 

Learning Mentor

"The Schools Health Education Unit is the jewel in the crown of the Health Education Authority." Major General Sir John Acland 1928 - 2006

Major General Sir John Acland

"Within the curriculum, we are part of the Healthy Schools programme - and the local, Director of Public Health Award. We cover many facets of health from emotional intelligence to safety education and our very strong, Anti-Bullying and Child Protection programmes. You can imagine our delight when the Local Authority and our school nurse made the following comments after we took part in the regional Schools Health Education Unit Survey: " Head Teacher.
“This was an amazing set of outcomes and really good evidence that (your school) is doing a wonderful job in prioritizing the health and well-being of its pupils … Well done to staff, governors and parents for all your work on this through the Director of Public Health award and other strategies. It is very clear that pupils feel happy, safe and involved at the school and your caring ethos shines through this data.”
Healthy Schools Coorduinator.

 

Headteacher & Healthy Schools Coordinator

"...the only question to cause a problem was 'has everyone got a pen?" Supervisor's notes following a school survey

Supervisor's Notes

...Many thanks for all your work with this year’s survey. It’s already proving to be invaluable especially against the severe cuts in services that are looming.

Health Promotion Manager