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Astrology, aspirin and your heart

One of many things to warm to from Richard Peto's appearance on The Life Scientific (the programme radio with the title odd)...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003zth

...was a re-telling of his argument with The Lancet when publishing findings about the beneficial effects of aspirin and other drugs in heart attack patients.  Huge trial, uncontrovertible results, practical implications: great stuff:

Brain matters

Someone told me recently, "men have seven times more grey matter in their brains than women, women have ten times more white matter than men".

I was sure this absolutely startling statement couldn't be true -- and when I checked, it was not -- but I think it could have both accurately remembered and quoted.  The trouble is, the original paper didn't say that, but it had been mangled in some reports (4).

The Infinite Monkey Rule

I always learn things from listening to the radio. On 'The Infinite Monkey Cage', I heard Brian Cox rattle off a 'rule of thumb', which goes something like:

A number plus or minus the square root of the sample size is consistent with random sampling error.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04yfsst (listen from 20 minutes in)

I hadn't heard that one, but deploying those key research tools, the back of an envelope and a pencil, I could see where it comes from.

Vulnerable pupils

We often look to see how groups of vulnerable young people are doing relative to their peers in our data sets.

We were recently prompted to look at young people who are young carers, who have special educational needs, who are attending PRUs, and who are in Special Schools.  The numbers from PRUs and Special Schools who completed any of our questionnaires are small, and they may not have answered the same set of questions, so this analysis is rather patchy. 

Greater Manchester CTZN project

Project CTZN is a programme about safer relationships for young people led by Greater Manchester Police and funded by the Home Office.

The core of the CTZN programme is a mobile-based, digital platform (app), which will be the foundation of a social network created by and for young people. See http://www.ctzn.co.uk

SHEU is supporting the administration of the project, in particular the Year 10 survey.

Letters and leaflets about the project are linked below.

Contact us: /contact

Pages

Comments about SHEU

"...the most comprehensive health education survey."

Daily Telegraph

"The Unit is to be congratulated in preparing ... material of the highest standard and worthy of wide dissemination." National Association for Environmental Education

National Association for Environmental Education

"The children found the survey very interesting and enjoyed doing it." Class Teacher

Class teacher

"We were talking about (the SHEU survey) data at our recent NSCoPSE Conference, for PSHE advisers and consultants. It would be really helpful if some of this powerful data and the trends could be shared in the consultation around the PSHE Review. Colleagues shared their very positive experiences of (the SHEU survey). It provides excellent evidence of behaviour change for children and young people and of the impact of PSHE and wider interventions."

Personal and Social Development Consultant

"We are planning next year's programmes around this information." Health Education Adviser

Health Education Adviser

"You and the team have the evidence to show how young people's behaviour has or hasn't changed over time." 
Tribute from a Health Education Co-ordinator to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Health Education Co-ordinator

Many thanks to you and your team for turning this around so quickly.
We really appreciate it, and also your extra support with the administration this time.

PSHE Lead Advisor

Any comments on specific survey questions that may have caused difficulty?
All questions are clearly worded and easy to answer

Class teacher

“(The SHEU survey) was very, very useful. It gave us reassurance we weren’t missing a trick. For example not many pupils in the sample year groups were taking illegal drugs, which re-enforced our opinions. But the survey also raised issues and flagged some things up. We discovered that some of our girls weren’t eating enough – the percentage of girls in our school not eating lunch the day before the survey was higher than the county average. There were other concerns too, specifically around cigarettes, alcohol and attendance.
The school used this data and took a number of actions to address it. More female peer mentors were put in place and the school asked NEXUS (the Extended Schools service) for help, so they developed a programme for girls which addressed their eating patterns, healthy eating, sex education and self-esteem issues.
We ran an anti-bullying group for Year 9 as a preventative measure, based upon data provided by our current Year 10 students.
The travel data revealed that a high number of pupils took the car to school so we involved the BIKE-IT scheme who ran assemblies, brought in their bikes (including one with a pedal-powered smoothie maker!), and raised awareness of health and green issues.
The information about how happy the students were with their lives raised some concerns as far fewer girls were as happy as the boys, so work was done around developing aspirations, role-models and self-esteem."        
 

Deputy Head, Secondary School

"The system works and I find quite a lot of it useful in my work. I've also recommended it to others."

Teenage Pregnancy Manager