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Astrology, aspirin and your heart

One of many things to warm to from Richard Peto's appearance on The Life Scientific (the programme radio with the title odd)...

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003zth

...was a re-telling of his argument with The Lancet when publishing findings about the beneficial effects of aspirin and other drugs in heart attack patients.  Huge trial, uncontrovertible results, practical implications: great stuff:

Brain matters

Someone told me recently, "men have seven times more grey matter in their brains than women, women have ten times more white matter than men".

I was sure this absolutely startling statement couldn't be true -- and when I checked, it was not -- but I think it could have both accurately remembered and quoted.  The trouble is, the original paper didn't say that, but it had been mangled in some reports (4).

The Infinite Monkey Rule

I always learn things from listening to the radio. On 'The Infinite Monkey Cage', I heard Brian Cox rattle off a 'rule of thumb', which goes something like:

A number plus or minus the square root of the sample size is consistent with random sampling error.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04yfsst (listen from 20 minutes in)

I hadn't heard that one, but deploying those key research tools, the back of an envelope and a pencil, I could see where it comes from.

Vulnerable pupils

We often look to see how groups of vulnerable young people are doing relative to their peers in our data sets.

We were recently prompted to look at young people who are young carers, who have special educational needs, who are attending PRUs, and who are in Special Schools.  The numbers from PRUs and Special Schools who completed any of our questionnaires are small, and they may not have answered the same set of questions, so this analysis is rather patchy. 

Greater Manchester CTZN project

Project CTZN is a programme about safer relationships for young people led by Greater Manchester Police and funded by the Home Office.

The core of the CTZN programme is a mobile-based, digital platform (app), which will be the foundation of a social network created by and for young people. See http://www.ctzn.co.uk

SHEU is supporting the administration of the project, in particular the Year 10 survey.

Letters and leaflets about the project are linked below.

Contact us: /contact

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Comments about SHEU

I would be extremely interested to see the results as I know how useful this information has been to the other schools in the
borough

Headteacher

"We are planning next year's programmes around this information." Health Education Adviser

Health Education Adviser

"I would like to say that this survey was very useful and made me realise things about PE and health that I had never realised before......Food at school is groovy, especially if your school does Jamie Olivers School Dinners. Viva apples and thanks for the survey." Female pupil, 13 yrs old

Female pupil, 13yrs

"I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your work regarding writing and compiling the sex education survey. The survey was well executed and the schools have found their individual reports very helpful. The results of the survey have enabled the Local Campaign Group to justify the need for young men's campaigns and given us invaluable insight as to the thoughts and experiences of this target group."

Teenage Pregnancy Strategy Manager

"I have never looked at myself in this way before." Pupil

Pupil

"The system works and I find quite a lot of it useful in my work. I've also recommended it to others."

Teenage Pregnancy Manager

"Many thanks to SHEU for your excellent professional support over the years."

PSHE teacher

"The Unit has a unique historical and contemporary archive of young people." Prof. Ted Wragg 1938-2005

Prof Ted Wragg, 1938-2005

"On behalf of all the health promoters in Scotland I would like to say a big thank to you and your colleagues for your excellent work over the years. This includes not only your survey work but your role as a visiting examiner in Scotland and adviser on course development."
Tribute from a Health Commissioner to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Health Commissioner

"I very much value the contribution the Health Related Behaviour Survey has made to the public health agenda and feel confident it will continue to do so." Tribute from a Director of Public Health to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Director of Public Health