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Research Links : about 5-11-year-old school pupils

Lifestyle
17-06

How parents perceive screen viewing in their 5–6 year old child within the context of their own screen viewing time

17-06

Technoference: Parent Distraction With Technology and Associations With Child Behavior Problems

17-05

Coparenting Conflict and Academic Readiness in Children of Teen Mothers: Effortful Control as a Mediator.

17-03

Bullying at school: Agreement between caregivers' and children's perception

17-03

More than Just Child

17-02

Social Media as a Catalyst and Trigger for Youth Violence

17-02

"…genius is more likely a male than a female quality"

17-01

Bullying in schools: the state of knowledge and effective interventions.

16-11

What children are telling us about bullying

16-08

How do children learn to cross the street? The process of pedestrian safety training

16-08

Learning game for training child bicyclists’ situation awareness

16-07

Disney Princess culture and young girls

16-03

How is adults’ screen time behaviour influencing their views on screen time restrictions for children?

16-03

Managing the screen-viewing behaviours of children aged 5–6 years: a qualitative analysis of parental strategies

16-02

Use of mobile and cordless phones and cognition in Australian primary school children

16-02

The Effectiveness of an Intervention to Promote Awareness and Reduce Online Risk Behavior in Early Adolescence

16-02

Children's hyperactivity, television viewing, and the potential for child effects

15-12

Children who see their parents divorce before age 7 are more likely than those who experience it at a later age to report health problems in their fifties

15-12

Exposure and Use of Mobile Media Devices by Young Children

15-12

Dress Nicer = Know More? Young Children’s Knowledge Attribution and Selective Learning Based on How Others Dress

15-11

How fairness develops in kids around the world

15-11

Children's Expressions of Positive Emotion are Sustained by Smiling, Touching, and Playing With Parents and Siblings: A Naturalistic Observational Study of Family Life.

15-11

Children’s Media Lives: Year 1 Findings - how children are thinking about and using digital media

15-09

The relationships between perceived parenting style, learning motivation, friendship satisfaction, and the addictive use of smartphones with elementary school students of South Korea

15-08

Worried parents in England are restricting child freedom

15-07

Parents’ estimations of their children’s happiness differ significantly from the child’s own assessment of their feelings

15-07

Do school crossing guards make crossing roads safer? A quasi-experimental study of pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions in Toronto, Canada

15-07

Science says parents of successful kids have these 9 things in common

15-07

Children make and maintain friendships with those different to themselves, but social class, more than ethnicity, remains a barrier to friendship

15-07

Electronic media use by children and adolescents

15-06

Peer Group Norms and Accountability Moderate the Effect of School Norms on Children's Intergroup Attitudes

15-06

Scary TV’s impact on kids is overstated

15-06

Strength-based parenting improves children’s resilience and stress levels

15-05

The association of parent's outcome expectations for child TV viewing with parenting practices and child TV viewing

15-05

Development of face perception earlier in Japanese children than Western children

15-05

Cyberbullying and Primary-School Aged Children: The Psychological Literature and the Challenge for Sociology

15-05

Record numbers of children enjoy reading every day

15-05

Where do the happiest children live?

15-05

The Double-Sided Message of The Lego Movie: The Effects of Popular Entertainment on Children in Consumer Culture

15-05

Your guide to the social networks your kids use

15-05

Primary school children mark privacy as top concern in online safety

15-04

Identifying Family Television Practices to Reduce Children’s Television Time

15-03

Do Parenting and Family Characteristics Moderate the Relation between Peer Victimization and Antisocial Behavior?

15-03

Under Which Conditions Do Early Adolescents Need Maternal Support?

15-03

Three questions about the Internet of things and children

15-03

Daily Violent Video Game Playing and Depression in Preadolescent Youth

15-03

Violent video games and children's aggression

15-01

Detecting children’s lies: Are parents accurate judges of their own children’s lies?

15-01

Punishment and reward in parental discipline for children aged 5 to 6 years: prevalence and groups at risk

15-01

Peer reactions to early childhood aggression in a preschool setting: Defenders, encouragers, or neutral bystander

14-12

Parents’ Influence on Children's Online Usage

14-12

Children’s online behaviour: issues of risk and trust Qualitative research findings

14-12

The Nature and Frequency of Cyber Bullying Behaviors and Victimization Experiences in Young Canadian Children

14-12

Bullying and 10-11 year olds : Young People into 2014 SHEU

14-11

1 in 10 adults have used abusive language towards a disabled person and children have adopted use of bullying language

14-09

Research into understanding of the cultural meaning of television for children and young people

14-09

Screen-Time Weight-loss Intervention Targeting Children at Home (SWITCH)

14-09

Attitudes and Trust of 6-year-old Children to Unfamiliar Adults: The Pilot Study

14-09

Screen time and cardiometabolic function in Dutch 5–6 year olds

14-09

Relationship between leisure time screen activity and aggressive and violent behaviour in Iranian children and adolescents

14-09

Can Classic Moral Stories Promote Honesty in Children?

14-08

Childrens drawings indicate later intelligence

14-08

Dog bite incidence and associated risk factors

14-07

Kids whose time is less structured are better able to meet their own goals

14-06

Kids with strong bonds to parents make better friends, can adapt in difficult relationships

14-06

Children and adults scan faces of own and other races differently

14-06

Can Classic Moral Stories Promote Honesty in Children?

14-06

Family predictors of continuity and change in social and physical aggression from ages 9 to 18

14-06

The Etiology of the Association Between Child Antisocial Behavior and Maternal Negativity Varies Across Aggressive and Non-Aggressive Rule-Breaking Forms of Antisocial Behavior

14-06

Screen Time at Home and School among Low-Income Children Attending Head Start

14-06

Young Children’s After-School Activities – There’s More to it Than Screen Time

14-04

To give a fish or to teach how to fish? Children weigh costs and benefits in considering what information to transmit (pdf)

14-03

Early Childhood Electronic Media Use as a Predictor of Poorer Well-being

14-03

Parental Monitoring of Children’s Media ConsumptionThe Long-term Influences on Body Mass Index in Children

14-03

Mediators and Moderators of Long-term Effects of Violent Video Games on Aggressive Behavior

14-03

Manual Control Age and Sex Differences in 4 to 11 Year Old Children (pdf)

14-03

Kids, candy, brain and behavior: Age differences in responses to candy gains and losses (pdf)

14-03

Child burns dangers in the home

14-03

Development of navigational working memory: Evidence from 6- to 10-year-old children

14-03

‘I Want to Play Alone’: Assessment and Correlates of Self-Reported Preference for Solitary Play in Young Children

14-03

Does it always feel good to get what you want? Young children differentiate between material and wicked desires (pdf)

14-03

How Young Children Evaluate People With and Without Disabilities (pdf)

14-03

The relation between 8- to 17-year-olds’ judgments of other’s honesty and their own past honest behaviors

14-03

Do parental perceptions of the neighbourhood environment influence children’s independent mobility? Evidence from Toronto

14-03

Will they like me? Adolescents’ emotional responses to peer evaluation

14-03

"“That’s Not Just Beautiful—That’s Incredibly Beautiful!” The Adverse Impact of Inflated Praise on Children With Low Self-Esteem"

14-03

In their own words : What bothers children online?

14-03

Parental bookreading practices among families in the Netherlands

14-01

Putting young children in front of the television: Antecedents and outcomes of parents’ use of television as a babysitter

14-01

A naturalistic study of stereotype threat in young female chess players

14-01

Excess Screen Time in US Children: Association With Family Rules and Alternative Activities

14-01

The power of the pram: do young children determine female job satisfaction?

13-12

The predictors of internet addiction behaviours for Taiwanese elementary school students

13-12

Characterization of Pulling Forces Exerted by Primary School Children While Carrying Trolley Bags

13-10

Cybervictimization and body esteem: Experiences of Swedish children and adolescents

13-10

Does neighbourhood count in affecting children's journeys to schools?

13-10

Ostracism in childhood and adolescence: Emotional, cognitive, and behavioral effects of social exclusion

13-10

Do Children Who Bully Their Peers Also Play Violent Video Games?

13-10

Israeli Mothers’ Willingness to Use Corporal Punishment to Correct the Misbehavior of Their Elementary School Children

13-10

Boys’ Perceptions of Singing: A Review of the Literature

13-05

Ridicule and being laughed at in the family: Gelotophobia, gelotophilia, and katagelasticism in young children and their parents

13-05

10 years of bullying data: what does it tell us?

13-05

Parent Perceptions of Neighborhood Safety and Children's Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Obesity

13-05

Only Kids Who Are Fools Would Do That!: Peer Social Norms Influence Children’s Risk-Taking Decisions

13-05

Prosocial peer affiliation suppresses genetic influences on non-aggressive antisocial behaviors during childhood

13-05

Chronic bullying victimization across school transitions: The role of genetic and environmental influences

13-05

Boys will be boys in the US but not in Asia

13-05

Community and child energy balance: differential associations between neighborhood environment and overweight risk by gender

13-05

Factors Associated With Screen Time Among School-Age Children in Korea

13-05

Towards a richer understanding of school-age children’s experiences of domestic violence: The voices of children and their mothers

13-05

The role of honesty and benevolence in children’s judgments of trustworthiness

13-05

Finding the roots of adolescent aggressive behavior: A test of three developmental pathways

13-05

Effects of Conflict in Tween Sitcoms on US Students' Moral Reasoning About Social Exclusion

13-05

Maternal Education, Home Environments, and the Development of Children and Adolescents (pdf)

13-04

Low Birth Weight and Parental Investment: Do Parents Favor the Fittest Child?

13-03

Do television and electronic games predict children's psychosocial adjustment? Longitudinal research using the UK Millennium Cohort Study (pdf)

13-02

Children’s social competence within close friendship: The role of self-perception and attachment orientations

13-02

Parent and Child Self-Reports of Dietary Behaviors, Physical Activity, and Screen Time

13-02

Maternal cell phone and cordless phone use during pregnancy and behaviour problems in 5-year-old children

13-02

TV viewing and obesity among Norwegian children: the importance of parental education

13-02

Temperament, parenting, and South Korean early adolescents’ physical aggression: A five-wave longitudinal analysis

13-02

Game on: do children absorb sports sponsorship messages? (pdf)

13-02

Are Children Copycats?

13-02

Swim club membership and the reproduction of happy, healthy children

13-02

Availability and night-time use of electronic entertainment and communication devices are associated with short sleep duration and obesity among Canadian children (pdf)

13-02

A qualitative exploration into young children’s perspectives and understandings of emotional difficulties in other children

13-02

Assessing Body Image in Young Children: A Preliminary Study of Racial and Developmental Differences (pdf)

13-02

Social-Information-Processing Patterns Mediate the Impact of Preventive Intervention on Adolescent Antisocial Behavior

13-01

Mothers' and Fathers' Work Hours, Child Gender, and Behavior in Middle Childhood (pdf)

12-12

Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes (pdf)

12-12

The effects of monetary and social rewards on task performance in children and adolescents: Liking is not enough

12-12

Peer Group Influence on Urban Preadolescents' Attitudes Toward Material Possessions

12-12

Does bullying others at school lead to adult aggression? The roles of drinking and university participation during the transition to adulthood

12-12

The Relationships Among Girls’ Prosocial Video Gaming, Perspective-Taking, Sympathy, and Thoughts About Violence

12-12

Environmental Correlates of Active Travel Behavior of Children

12-12

Cyberbullying Among Primary School Students in Turkey: Self-Reported Prevalence and Associations with Home and School Life

12-12

Carers of young and old 'are struggling to cope'

12-12

Understanding the drive to escort: a cross-sectional analysis examining parental attitudes towards children's school travel and independent mobility (pdf)

12-10

The amount of time children spend watching TV and playing video games

12-10

How did the television get in the child's bedroom? Analysis of family interviews

12-10

Is TV Traumatic for All Youths? The Role of Preexisting Posttraumatic-Stress Symptoms in the Link Between Disaster Coverage and Stress

12-10

Cul-de-sac kids

12-10

A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Pretend Play in U.S. and Italian Children

12-10

Traditional bullying as a potential warning sign of cyberbullying (pdf)

12-10

The emergence of cyberbullying: A survey of primary school pupils’ perceptions and experiences

12-08

Chat messages…online pictures…chatting online : data from Young People into 2012 (pdf)

12-08

Family Meals and Child Academic and Behavioral Outcomes

12-08

The Association between Leisure-Time Physical Activities and Asthma Symptoms among 10- to 12-Year-Old Children

12-06

I don’t want to get involved: Shyness, psychological control, and youth activities

12-06

Racial and Gender Differences in the Relationship Between Children’s Television Use and Self-Esteem

12-04

How to avoid 'Nature Deficit Disorder’

12-04

Young children’s perspectives and understandings of emotional difficulties in other children

12-04

Parents and play - The Ribena Plus Play Report (pdf)

12-04

Stigma Building Blocks : How Instruction and Experience Teach Children About Rejection by Outgroups (pdf)

12-04

Sleep and Television and Computer Habits of Swedish School-Age Children

12-04

Parental work characteristics and time with children : The moderating effects of parent's gender and children's age

12-04

How is parenting style related to child anti-social behaviour?

12-02

E-safety education: Young people, surveillance and responsibility

12-02

Influencing factors of screen time in preschool children: an exploration of parents' perceptions through focus groups in six European countries

12-02

Rates of cyber victimization and bullying among male Australian primary and high school students

12-02

Internet surfing for kindergarten children: A feasibility study (pdf)

12-02

Preschool children’s perceptions of overweight peers

12-02

Gender differences in consequences of ADHD symptoms in a community-based organization for youth

12-02

Children, smartphones and unsuitable content

12-02

Culture starved kids

12-01

Exergaming for Health: A Community-Based Pediatric Weight Management Program Using Active Video Gaming

12-01

An international exploratory investigation of students’ perceptions of stressful life events

11-11

Young children’s ICT experiences in the home: Some parental perspectives

11-10

Can the Internet Be Used to Reach Parents for Family-Based Childhood Obesity Interventions?

11-10

Only Two Hours? A Qualitative Study of the Challenges Parents Perceive in Restricting Child Television Time

11-10

You could just ignore me': Situating peer exclusion within the contingencies of girls’ everyday interactional practices

11-10

Attitudes to childhood overweight and obesity: The limits of cultural explanations

11-08

The Online Abuse of Education Professionals

11-08

Why children watch multi-screens

11-08

Helping children reach their full potential (pdf)

11-08

Setting the Baseline: The National Literacy Trust’s first annual survey into reading (pdf)

11-08

The feel of mobility: how children use sedentary lifestyles as a site of resistance

11-08

Monkey See, Monkey Do, Monkey Hurt: Longitudinal Effects of Exposure to Violence on Children’s Aggressive Behavior (pdf)

11-07

Importance of Bringing Dogs in Contact with Children during Their Socialization Period for Better Behavior (pdf)

11-07

The Making of an Outsider: Growing Up in Poverty in Northern Ireland

11-07

Games consules: Joint pain and game and mobile use

11-07

‘The computer is not for you to be looking around, it is for schoolwork’: Challenges for digital inclusion as Latino immigrant families negotiate children’s access to the internet

11-07

Children's school travel in Glasgow

11-07

The Nature of Giving Time to Your Child’s School

11-05

Children prefer watching TV to being active

11-05

Television viewing, food preferences, and food habits among children

11-05

Children’s Drawings of the Self as an Expression of Cultural Conceptions of the Self

11-03

Only Two Hours? A Qualitative Study of the Challenges Parents Perceive in Restricting Child Television Time

11-03

Families and Home Computer Use: Exploring U.S. Parent Perceptions of the Importance of Current Technology

11-03

Racial and Gender Differences in the Relationship Between Children’s Television Use and Self-Esteem

11-02

Almost being there: Video communication with young children

11-02

Maternal employment, work schedules, and U.S. children’s body mass index

11-02

Childhood depression and mass print magazines in the USA and Canada

11-02

Electronic media use by children in Turkish families of high socioeconomic level and familial factors

11-02

Social competence of Hong-Kong elementary-school children; maternal authoritativeness, supportive responses and children's coping strategies

11-01

"Reasons to be cheerful" NFER report on how various aspects of their lives affect children's happiness

Exercise, Lifestyle
15-10

Children’s implicit recall of junk food, alcohol and gambling sponsorship in Australian sport

Health, Lifestyle
15-01

Bedroom air quality and vacuuming frequency are associated with repeat child asthma hospital admissions

Mental Health 5-16+, Health, Lifestyle
14-11

Bullying continues to impact on wellbeing of pupils, parents and professionals

Exercise, Health, Lifestyle
14-10

Parenting stress: a cross-sectional analysis of associations with childhood obesity, physical activity, and TV viewing

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