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Research Links : about 5-11-year-old school pupils

Food
13-11

The Impact of Food and Nutrient-Based Standards on Primary School Children’s Lunch and Total Dietary Intake: A Natural Experimental Evaluation of Government Policy in England (pdf)

13-11

Children eat more after sleeping less

13-11

Broccoli’s extreme makeover in the US… and … Beneforte super broccoli in the UK

13-10

Increasing the proportion of children willing to try new foods and to continue eating them

13-10

Children on free school meals are being failed in Northumberland

13-10

Does consumption of high-fructose corn syrup beverages cause obesity in children? (pdf)

13-10

Can a school-based intervention increase fruit and vegetable consumption for children with Autism? (pdf)

13-10

Food recommendations in domestic education, Belgium 1890–1940

13-10

Use of calorie information at fast food and chain restaurants among US youth aged 9–18 years (pdf)

13-10

Amounts of Artificial Food Colors in Commonly Consumed Beverages and Potential Behavioral Implications for Consumption in Children

13-10

Sociodemographic Characteristics and Beverage Intake of Children Who Drink Tap Water

13-08

Sugar-sweetened beverages and weight gain in 2- to 5-year-old children

13-06

Increasing portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school lunch program can increase fruit and vegetable consumption

13-06

A school-based education programme to reduce salt intake in children and their families (School-EduSalt)

13-06

Cheese comes from plants and fish fingers are made of chicken

13-05

Use of calorie information at fast food and chain restaurants among US youth aged 9–18 years, 2010 (pdf)

13-05

Ten-year changes in positive and negative marker food, fruit, vegetables, and salad intake in 9–10 year olds

13-05

Television watching and the emotional impact on social modeling of food intake among children

13-05

“You must finish your dinner”: Meal time dynamics between grandparents, parents and grandchildren in urban China

13-05

Children's Food Trust Research

13-05

Marketing foods to children: a comparison of nutrient content between children's and non-children's products

13-05

How do children learn eating practices? Beyond the nutritional information, the importance of social eating

13-05

Breakfast skipping among Benghazi primary school children

13-05

Improving hydration in children: A sensible guide

13-05

Rewards can be used effectively with repeated exposure to increase liking of vegetables in 4–6-year-old children

13-05

When chefs adopt a school? An evaluation of a cooking intervention in English primary schools

13-05

Fruit and vegetable exposure in children is linked to the selection of a wider variety of healthy foods at school

13-05

The effects of television and Internet food advertising on parents and children.

13-05

Photographic Examination of Student Lunches in Schools Using the Balanced School Day Versus Traditional School Day Schedules

13-02

SHEU food data: fruit, vegetables, 5-a-day

13-02

Family meals can help children reach their 5 A Day: a cross-sectional survey of children's dietary intake from London primary schools

13-02

Frequency of family meals and childhood overweight: a systematic review (pdf)

13-02

Associations between home- and family-related factors and fruit juice and soft drink intake among 10- to 12-year old children.

13-02

When chefs adopt a school? An evaluation of a cooking intervention in English primary schools

13-02

Parental restriction and children’s diets. The chocolate coin and Easter egg experiments

13-02

Effects of a free school breakfast programme on children’s attendance, academic achievement and short-term hunger (pdf)

13-02

Associations between teacher support and students' fruit and vegetable consumption in low-income elementary schools in central Texas

13-02

Parental education and frequency of food consumption in European children

13-02

The Association Between Body Metrics and Breakfast Food Choice in Children

13-02

Effect of different children’s menu labeling designs on family purchases

13-02

Middle School Student and Parent Perceptions of Government-Sponsored Free School Breakfast and Consumption

13-02

Infant nutrition in relation to eating behaviour and fruit and vegetable intake at age 5 years

13-02

Nutrition beliefs of disadvantaged parents of overweight children

13-02

Restriction of television food advertising in South Korea: impact on advertising of food companies

13-02

Psychosocial Influences on Children's Food Consumption

13-02

A pilot evaluation of appetite-awareness training in the treatment of childhood overweight and obesity (pdf)

13-02

Views of children and parents on limiting unhealthy food, drink and alcohol sponsorship of elite and children's sports

13-02

Occasional family meals boost kids’ fruit and veg intake

13-02

Modification of the school cafeteria environment can impact childhood nutrition. Results from the Wise Mind and LA Health studies

13-02

Australian children who drink milk (plain or flavored) have higher milk and micronutrient intakes but similar body mass index to those who do not drink milk

13-02

Contingent choice. Exploring the relationship between sweetened beverages and vegetable consumption

13-02

Eggs versus chewable vitamins: Which intervention can increase nutrition and test scores in rural China?

13-02

Marketing Sugary Cereals to Children in the Digital Age: A Content Analysis of 17 Child-Targeted Websites

13-02

Cutting children’s exposure to unhealthy food advertisements (pdf)

13-02

School children's own views, roles and contribution to choices regarding diet and activity in Spain (pdf)

13-01

Taste preferences in association with dietary habits and weight status in European children

13-01

Cost-free and sustainable incentive increases healthy eating decisions during elementary school lunch

13-01

Do fast foods cause asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis and eczema? Global findings from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) Phase Three

13-01

Fast-food 'link' to child asthma and eczema

12-12

Healthy Heroes: Improving young children's lifestyles in Lancashire; an evaluation of a challenge based schools' programme (pdf)

12-12

Compliance with children's television food advertising regulations in Australia (pdf)

12-12

Fruit and vegetable intake of primary school children: a study of school meals

12-12

Consumption of beef/veal/lamb in Australian children: Intake, nutrient contribution and comparison with other meat, poultry and fish categories (pdf)

12-12

What do lunchtime staff think about children's eating habits following a healthy eating intervention? (pdf)

12-12

Food consumption and cardiovascular risk factors in European children

12-12

A Pilot Study of Effects of Fruit Intake on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Children

12-12

A School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Snacking Pilot Intervention for Lower Mississippi Delta Children

12-12

Pupils not claiming free school meals (pdf)

12-12

Diabetes levels and the availability of high fructose corn syrup

12-12

Increases in support structures for healthy eating especially in low decile schools in New Zealand

12-12

Differences in food consumption according to weight status and physical activity levels among Greek children

12-12

Eating problems in young children – a population-based study

12-10

Breakfast is associated with enhanced cognitive function in schoolchildren. An internet based study

12-10

Clustering of food and activity preferences in primary school children

12-10

Smart Choices for Healthy Families A Pilot Study for the Treatment of Childhood Obesity in Low-Income Families

12-10

School Nutrition Policy: An Evaluation of the Rhode Island Healthier Beverages Policy in Schools

12-10

Increasing children's lunchtime consumption of fruit and vegetables: an evaluation of the Food Dudes programme

12-10

Bostin Value: An Intervention to Increase Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in a Deprived Neighborhood of Dudley

12-10

Current status of managing food allergies in schools in Seoul, Korea

12-10

Public Health Nutrition Special Issue – Taking childhood obesity off the menu

12-10

Poor children shun free school meals for stigma-free sandwich

12-10

Marketing foods to children through product packaging: prolific, unhealthy and misleading

12-08

Evaluation of free school meals pilot report (pdf)

12-08

Butterbeer, Cauldron Cakes, and Fizzing Whizzbees: Food in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter series (pdf)

12-08

US School Lunches and Lunches Brought from Home (pdf)

12-08

Childhood Obesity Jnl: Special Issue on US School Food

12-08

Let’s Move Salad Bars to Schools: A US Public–Private Partnership To Increase Student Fruit and Vegetable Consumption (pdf)

12-08

Artificial Food Colors and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Symptoms: Conclusions to Dye for

12-08

Location of breakfast consumption predicts body mass index change in young Hong Kong children (pdf)

12-08

Continuity in Primary School Children’s Eating Problems and the Influence of Parental Feeding Strategies

12-08

The healthy options for nutrition environments in schools (Healthy ONES) group randomized trial: using implementation models to change nutrition policy and environments in low income schools.

12-08

Reducing Childhood Obesity by Eliminating 100% Fruit Juice

12-08

Perceptions of healthy eating and physical activity in an ethnically diverse sample of young children and their parents: the DEAL prevention of obesity study

12-08

La sprouts: a garden-based nutrition intervention pilot program influences motivation and preferences for fruits and vegetables in Latino youth.

12-06

“What’s in Your Lunch Box Today?”: Health, Respectability, and Ethnicity in the Primary Classroom (pdf)

12-06

Do children eat less at meals when allowed to serve themselves?

12-06

Using Mobile Fruit Vendors to Increase Access to Fresh Fruit and Vegetables for Schoolchildren

12-06

Child consumption of fruit and vegetables: the roles of child cognitions and parental feeding practices

12-06

Children’s understanding of family financial resources and their impact on eating healthily

12-06

Effect of labeling on new vegetable dish acceptance in preadolescent children

12-06

Family mealtimes: A contextual approach to understanding childhood obesity

12-06

Mothers’ perceptions of the negative impact on TV food ads on children’s food choices

12-06

Evaluation of a School-based Multicomponent Nutrition Education Program to Improve Young Children's Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

12-06

Parental socioeconomic status and soft drink consumption of the child.

12-06

Earlier predictors of eating disorder symptoms in 9-year-old children

12-06

How emotions expressed by adults’ faces affect the desire to eat liked and disliked foods in children compared to adults

12-06

French Children Start Their School Day with a Hydration Deficit

12-04

How supermarkets promote junk food to children and their parents

12-04

Fast-food consumption and educational test scores in the USA

12-04

Developing Media Interventions to Reduce Household Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption

12-04

School children's own views, roles and contribution to choices regarding diet and activity in Spain

12-04

Eating at home prevents childhood obesity

12-04

Should we play hide-and-seek with children’s vegetables?

12-04

Mixed progress to improve US food marketing influencing children’s diets

12-04

Avoid strict rules on what children can or cannot eat

12-02

Cooking skills and healthy eating

12-02

Downward trend in 'crisp eaters' and veg. eating up - SHEU data (pdf)

12-02

Food sustainability education as a route to healthier eating: evaluation of a multi-component school programme in English primary schools

12-02

Children's understanding of food and meals in the foodscape at school

12-02

Healthy and tasty school snacks: suggestions from Brazilian children consumers

12-02

Agreement between child and parent reports of 10- to 12-year-old children’s meal pattern and intake of snack foods

12-02

A narrative review of psychological and educational strategies applied to young children's eating behaviours aimed at reducing obesity risk

12-02

Do Health Claims and Prior Awareness Influence Consumers' Preferences for Unhealthy Foods? The Case of Functional Children's Snacks

12-02

Cost-free and sustainable incentive increases healthy eating decisions during elementary school lunch

12-02

Presweetened and Nonpresweetened Ready-to-Eat Cereals at Breakfast Are Associated With Improved Nutrient Intake but Not With Increased Body Weight of Children and Adolescents

12-01

How Fathers Influence Children's Eating Habits

12-01

Do girls or boys eat more fresh fruit?

12-01

The 21st century gingerbread house: How companies are marketing junk food to children online

12-01

Engagement with the National Healthy Schools Programme is associated with higher fruit and vegetable consumption in primary school children

12-01

Single nut or total nut avoidance in nut allergic children: outcome of nut challenges to guide exclusion diets

12-01

A qualitative study of families of a child with a nut allergy (pdf)

12-01

Children’s weight status and maternal and paternal feeding practices

12-01

Fast-food consumption and educational test scores in the USA

11-12

School Meals and Daily Life Issues: The LACA/ParentPay Report (pdf)

11-11

52% of 10-11 year olds girls report eating vegetables ‘on most days’ (pdf)

11-11

Traffic light food labelling in schools and beyond

11-11

When food is neither good nor bad: Children’s evaluations of transformed and combined food products

11-11

Does skipping breakfast help with weight-loss?

11-11

89% of parents are happy with their child's school meals

11-10

Children’s selection of fruit and vegetables in a ‘dream versus healthy’ lunch-box survey

11-08

Children use the same ploys as adults to justify eating junk food... and ... Report

11-08

Children's Intake of Fruit and Selected Energy-Dense Nutrient-Poor Foods Is Associated with Fathers' Intake

11-08

Building grass roots capacity to tackle childhood obesity

11-08

Ready-to-Eat Cereals at Breakfast Are Associated With Improved Nutrient Intake but Not With Increased Body Weight of Children and Adolescents

11-08

Sixth annual survey of take up of school meals in England

11-08

Healthy and tasty school snacks: suggestions from Brazilian children consumers

11-08

Food Plating Preferences of Children: The importance of presentation on desire for diversity

11-07

Childhood eating disorders: British national surveillance study (pdf)

11-07

Healthy school meals, healthy school minds: how ditching Turkey Twizzlers can improve results and behaviour

11-07

Eating sweets, energy levels and being overweight

11-07

A Food Growing in Schools Task Force.will look at schools that are already running successful growing schemes and find out what's preventing other schools following their lead.

11-07

Home-made muffins and curries have topped a new poll of favourite healthy recipes to make with children

11-07

A focus group exploration of primary school children's perceptions and experiences of fruit and vegetables

11-07

Effect of increased fruit and fat content in an acidified milk product on preference, liking and wanting in children

11-07

School meal budget cuts and U-turn on cooking skills in schools could affect childhood obesity

11-07

Children's Eating Behavior: The Importance of Nutrition Standards for Foods in Schools

11-07

Peanut Allergy in Children: Relationships to Health-Related Quality of Life, Anxiety, and Parental Stress

11-05

Consistency of children's dietary choices: annual repeat measures from 5 to 13 years

11-05

Breakfast frequency inversely associated with BMI and body fatness in Hong Kong Chinese children aged 9–18 years

11-05

Association between parenting styles and own fruit and vegetable consumption among Portuguese mothers of school children

11-05

What helps children eat well? A qualitative exploration of resilience among disadvantaged families

11-05

Parent's responses to nutrient claims and sports celebrity endorsements on energy-dense and nutrient-poor foods

11-05

Healthy Schools Plus - Food Factor (pdf)

11-05

Higher Quality Intake From U.S. School Lunch Meals Compared With Bagged Lunches

11-05

An analysis of the content of food industry pledges on marketing to children

11-05

Healthy eating in early years settings: a review of current national to local guidance for North West England

11-03

New Research Continues to Give Hope for Outgrowing Milk Allergy

11-03

Walnuts and antioxidants

11-03

A primary-school-based study to reduce prevalence of childhood obesity in Catalunya (pdf)

11-03

Genetic clue to peanut allergy

11-03

The substance and sources of young children's healthy eating and physical activity knowledge: implications for obesity prevention efforts

11-03

The U.S. School Breakfast Program Strengthens Household Food Security among Low-Income Households with Elementary School Children

11-03

‘It's very hard to find what to put in the kid's lunch’: What Perth parents think about food for school lunch boxes

11-03

Mineral oils, recycled cardboard boxes and food

11-03

Effects of a restricted elimination diet on the behaviour of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

11-03

Parenting and Feeding Behaviors Associated With School-Aged African American and White Children

11-03

Children with More Severe Eczema Less Likely to Outgrow Milk, Egg Allergy

11-02

'Food Matters' – a nutrition award for Hertfordshire schools

11-02

Do children and their parents eat a similar diet?

11-02

Children's diet and nutrition

11-02

The substance and sources of young American children's knowledge related to healthy eating, physical activity and media practices.

11-02

Children's diet, brain development and intelligence

11-02

Food allergy in children and young people - NICE guidelines

11-01

Your school can receive a free potato growing kit

11-01

Primary school meals in Stoke on Trent

11-01

Teaching healthful food choices to U.S. Elementary school students and their parents: The Nutrition Detectives™ program

11-01

The 'Food Dudes' scheme to encourage schoolchildren to eat more fruit and vegetables

11-01

Parents' and primary healthcare practitioners' perspectives on the safety of honey and other traditional paediatric healthcare approaches

11-01

Milder tasting bran offers huge potential for fortified bakery

10-12

Tree nut allergy, egg allergy, and asthma in children

10-12

Healthy eating and geography lesson plans

10-12

A quick guide to reviewing your school catering service

10-12

Using brand characters to promote young children's liking of and purchase requests for fruit.

10-12

Dietary sensitivities and ADHD symptoms: Thirty-five years of research

10-12

Dietary habits, economic status, academic performance and body mass index in Turkish school children

10-11

Dietitians and nutritionists who help schools can now sign up for bespoke training

10-11

An exploratory look at teacher perceptions of school food environment and wellness policies

10-11

The relationship between Flemish children's home food environment and dietary patterns in childhood and adolescence

10-11

Modeling the long term health outcomes and cost-effectiveness of two interventions promoting fruit and vegetable intake among schoolchildren in the Netherlands

Education, Food
12-09

A Review of the Evidence: School-based Interventions to Address Obesity Prevention in Children 6-12 Years of Age

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