Governors

We have done a variety of customised surveys including the Regional Governors SRE Survey, summarised below.


A report of a survey of Chairs of School Governors carried out in the South-West of England 2002 South-West Regional Health Authority
In association with: Schools Health Education Unit, Exeter

Summary

REGIONAL GOVERNOR SURVEY 2002: SEX AND RELATIONSHIP EDUCATION

South-West Regional Health Authority        Health Development Agency

Summary of findings from a survey of Chairs of School Governors in the South-West of England

A postal survey of chairs of governors of all schools in the South-West was carried out in the Spring of 2002, to determine their awareness of their responsibilities under the new Sex and Relationship Guidance.

The survey was planned and organised by a team of people: Christine MacInnes [Health Development Agency], Dali Sidebottom [Health Promotion Specialist], Brian Mackenzie [South-West Region Teenage Pregnancy Coordinator]. Support was also provided by Simon Goodenough of the National Governor's Council.

The services of the Schools Health Education Unit were used to carry out the survey, and process the resulting data.

A total of 911 questionnaires were returned from 2375 schools contacted by the end of the Spring, when no more were processed. This 38% response rate is quite typical of a postal survey, but is disappointing in that limited confidence can be given to any inferences about the whole population of schools. 97 governors requested further training.

Q1. Is your governing body aware of the contents and implications of the latest 'Sex and Relationship' guidance from the DfES? (July 2000).

18% of respondents said they were not aware of it at all, and a further 47% admitted only a small degree of awareness.

Q2. Does your school have a Sex Education/Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) Policy?

94% had a policy, with similar proportions in schools from the primary and secondary phases.

Q3. When was the SRE policy last reviewed and updated?

27% said that it had been reviewed in the last 6 months, a combined percentage of 55% reviewing it in the last year.

Q4: Is the SRE policy part of a broader Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) and Citizenship policy?

77% declare that their sex education policy is part of a broader approach to PSHE and Citizenship.

Q5: Who was involved in the development of the SRE policy?

The three groups most commonly involved in the development of policy were Headteachers (88%), Teachers (84%) and Governors (80%).

Q6: Which of these groups have been informed about the SRE policy?

From the same list we see the same top three with Headteachers, Teachers and Governors all at nearly 90%. Parents were said to be informed by 70% of schools and pupils by 23% of schools (47% of secondary schools).

Q7: In what ways has your SRE policy been put into practice in the school?

No prompts were given in this question. The most common classes of response were:
34% Formal sex education lessons; 26% Within PSHE (49% for secondary phase schools) ; 13% Programme for particular year groups ; 12% Science lessons ; 10% School nurse talks to Year 6

Q8: Who delivers SRE in your school?

From a list, the most commonly selected items from all schools were:
90% Teachers ; 43% School Nurse ; 25% PSHE teachers (78% in secondary schools) ; 14% Science Teachers (49% in secondary schools) ; 7% External agency (22% in secondary schools)

More schools report using a school nurse in delivery than in developing policy.

Q9. Is SRE training included in your school's Professional Development Strategy for Staff?

47% said yes (57% of secondary schools).

Conclusions and recommendations

Of the respondents, who might be among the more diligent of governors, awareness of recent official Guidance was not good. It may be that key governors were aware of it when they last revised their Sex and Relationship policy, but currently few claim familiarity with the Guidance document, which contains important guidance about confidentiality, dealing with sensitive issues and many other issues.

There is some evidence here of a need for specific Governor training: 97 returns specifically requested further training in this topic.

Pointers for repeating this type of survey are noted in the full report. A copy of the questionnaire with the full results is available on the SHEU website

Full report

 

PSHE: Sex and Relationship Education
Regional Governor Survey Report

SEX AND RELATIONSHIP EDUCATION

A report of a survey of Chairs of School Governors carried out in the South-West of England 2002

South-West Regional Health Authority

In association with:

Schools Health Education Unit, Exeter

REGIONAL GOVERNOR SURVEY 2002: SEX AND RELATIONSHIP EDUCATION

Summary

A postal survey of chairs of governors of all schools in the South-West was carried out in the Spring of 2002, to determine their awareness of their responsibilities under the new Sex and Relationship Guidance.

About a third of those contacted returned a completed survey form.

Of the respondents, who might be among the more diligent of governors, awareness of the Guidance was not good.

A copy of the full results is available on the SHEU website www.sheu.org.uk


Introduction

A postal survey of Chairs of Governors was carried out in the Spring of 2002. The purpose of the survey was:

[*] to determine the awareness of Governors of their responsibilities under the new Sex and Relationship Guidance

The survey was planned and organised by a team of people:

Christine MacInnes [Health Development Agency]

Dali Sidebottom [Health Promotion Specialist ]

Brian Mackenzie [South-West Region Teenage Pregnancy Coordinator]

Support was also provided by Simon Goodenough of the National Governor's Council.

The services of the Schools Health Education Unit were used to carry out the survey, and process the resulting data.

METHODS

Each school received a package for the Chair of Governors containing:

[*] letter from Brian Mackenzie Regional Teenage Pregnancy Co-ordinator

[*] survey questionnaire

[*] freepost envelope for return of questionnaire

[*] freepost reply card

If a reply card had not been received by a week after the deadline given, a reminder letter was sent from the SHEU.

The reply card bore the same address label as was used to send the packages out. It also offered the Chair an opportunity to indicate (a) if they would be prepared to take part in a follow-up telephone survey, and (b) to request further training in this topic.

A total of 911 questionnaires were returned from 2375 schools contacted by the end of the Spring, when no more were processed. This 38% response rate is quite typical of a postal survey, but is disappointing in that limited confidence can be given to any inferences about the whole population of schools.

Points for improvement of methods include:

There were not sufficient spare packs for additional questionnaires, envelopes or reply cards to be sent with the reminder letter.

Several schools receiving a reminder letter complained either that the time given for completion was too short, or that the questionnaire had never been received. The SHEU researcher responsible for managing their end of the project also happens to be a Chair of Governors, and was surprised how late the materials were received. Greater allowance could have been made for the logistics of getting the survey to the right person.

Several schools with pupils only from KS1 or KS2 commented that the survey seemed inappropriate for them. While the letter accompanying the survey was from the Teenage Pregnancy Co-ordinator, none of the questions were irrelevant to the primary phase. Nonetheless one comment received from a Chair was that the survey had not been returned because it was "totally inappropriate for a primary school"; another Chair in a First School observed that "as sex education is not required until ... KS2, your survey did not seem relevant and was placed in file 13!". It is not possible to say how common was this reaction among non-responders, but indicates that the relevance to the primary phase could have been emphasised.

The best excuse for not returning the form was: "your questionnaire provoked a lot of discussion ... and we have decided to revisit this whole area at a meeting later in the year. I regret therefore that it is not possible to answer it at present."

QUESTIONNAIRE CONTENT

The survey booklet contained the following questions:

Q1. Is your governing body aware of the contents and implications of the latest 'Sex and Relationship' guidance from the DfES? (July 2000)

Q2. Does your school have a Sex Education/Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) Policy?

Q3. When was the SRE policy last reviewed and updated?

Q4: Is the SRE policy part of a broader Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) and Citizenship policy?

Q5: Who was involved in the development of the SRE policy?

Q6: Which of these groups have been informed about the SRE policy?

Q7: In what ways has your SRE policy been put into practice in the school?

Q8: Who delivers SRE in your school?

Q9. Is SRE training included in your school's Professional Development Strategy for Staff?

Q10. How well informed do you feel with regard to your responsibilities for Sex and Relationship Education in the school?

Q11a: Type of school?

Q11b. Does your school have a religious foundation?

Q12. Name of LEA?

Any other comments on Sex and Relationship Education.

A copy of the questionnaire is appended, where the options for answering may be seen.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Q1. Is your governing body aware of the contents and implications of the latest 'Sex and Relationship' guidance from the DfES? (July 2000).

18% of respondents said they were not aware of it at all, and a further 47% admitted only a small degree of awareness. Awareness was better among respondents from secondary schools, with "some detail" being claimed by 44% (compared with 29% of respondents from primary schools).

It is the case that every school should have received a copy of the Government's SRE Guidance issued in summer of 2000, and so would have been expected to refer to it in their last review of sex education policy.

Q2. Does your school have a Sex Education/Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) Policy?

94% had a policy, with similar proportions in the primary and secondary phases.

Q3. When was the SRE policy last reviewed and updated?

27% said that it had been reviewed in the last 6 months, a combined percentage of 55% reviewing it in the last year.

All of these schools will have reviewed their policies since Summer 2000.

Q4: Is the SRE policy part of a broader Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) and Citizenship policy?

77% declare that their sex education policy is part of a broader approach to PSHE and Citizenship.

Q5: Who was involved in the development of the SRE policy?

The three groups most commonly involved in the development of policy were Headteachers (88%), Teachers (84%) and Governors (80%).
Technically, sex education policy is a responsibility of the governors and so we might expect this figure to be higher. There are a great number of policies to be adopted by governors, and the details of the sex education policy may have been obscured by memories of the others.
Moreover, the policy for sex education may in the first instance be drafted by a subcommittee or other group, of which the Chair may have little recollection.

Other groups commonly involved included the PSHE Co-ordinator (55%), school nurse (30%) and parents (30%). 15% involved the LEA adviser (22% in secondary schools).

Q6: Which of these groups have been informed about the SRE policy?

From the same list we see the same top three with Headteachers, Teachers and Governors all at nearly 90%.

Parents were said to be informed by 70% of schools and pupils by 23% of schools (47% of secondary schools).

Q7: In what ways has your SRE policy been put into practice in the school?

No prompts were given in this question. The most common classes of response were:

34% Formal sex education lessons

26% Within PSHE (49% for secondary phase schools)

13% Programme for particular year groups

12% Science lessons

10% School nurse talks to Year 6

Q8: Who delivers SRE in your school?

From a list, the most commonly selected items from all schools were:

90% Teachers

43% School Nurse

25% PSHE teachers (78% in secondary schools)

14% Science Teachers (49% in secondary schools)

7% External agency (22% in secondary schools)

More schools report using a school nurse in delivery than in developing policy.

Q9. Is SRE training included in your school's Professional Development Strategy for Staff?

47% said yes (57% of secondary schools).

Q10. How well informed do you feel with regard to your responsibilities for Sex and Relationship Education in the school?

A scale was given from 1 to 5, with 1 being the least well informed. About a third went for the middle point (3), and a further third went for the 'medium-high' fourth point.

This perhaps sits at odds with the limited confidence reported about the Guidance on SRE in Question 1.

Q11a: Type of school?

60% were primary schools and 12% secondary. If we sweep first, junior, and primary schools into a 'primary phase' group, 80% were primary phase and 12% secondary phase with 9% of schools not being readily classed as either.

4% were independent schools and 4% were special schools.

Q11b. Does your school have a religious foundation?

35% of the schools had a religious foundation, of which 81% were Church of England.

Q12. Name of LEA?

The sample came from the following authorities:

LEA : N : % : OS

Bath & North East Somerset : 30 : 5% : 4%

Bournemouth : 13 : 2% : 2%

Bristol City : 38 : 6% : 8%

Cornwall CC : 89 : 14% : 12%

Devon CC : 119 : 18% : 18%

Dorset CC : 52 : 8% : 9%

Gloucestershire CC : 90 : 14% : 14%

North Somerset : 33 : 5% : 4%

Plymouth : 40 : 6% : 5%

Poole : 18 : 3% : 2%

South Gloucestershire : 35 : 5% : 5%

Swindon : 20 : 3% : 3%

Torquay : 10 : 2% : 2%

Wiltshire CC : 64 : 10% : 12%

[Not given] : 260 :

All : 911

This quite closely reflects the composition of the original sample (OS), although Wiltshire governors may have been less keen than Cornwall ones.

Any other comments on Sex and Relationship Education.

The most common classes of response here were:

32% Area under review

10% PSHE as core subject

10% Fully discussed with parents

10% School well organised with regard to SRE

9% Involvement of School Nurse/other Health professional

8% More information required

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

[*] If this type of survey is repeated in the South-West or elsewhere, there are noted above several opportunities for strengthening the approach and content of the questionnaire.

[*] Of the respondents, who might be among the more diligent of governors, awareness of recent official Guidance was not good.

{o} It may be that key governors were aware of it when they last revised their Sex and Relationship policy, but currently few claim familiarity with the document, which contains important guidance about confidentiality, dealing with sensitive issues and many other issues.

[*] There is some evidence here of a need for specific Governor training: 97 returns specifically requested further training in this topic.
 


APPENDIX:

Copy of questionnaire

Descriptive statistics

Results broken down by phase.

Full results

 

Q1. Is your governing body aware of the contents and implications of the latest 'Sex and Relationship' guidance from the DfES? (July 2000)
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
Not aware of it at all % 18.4% 12.1% 17.7%
N 132 12 158
Aware of it to a small degree % 47.9% 37.4% 46.8%
N 344 37 417
Aware of it in some detail % 28.8% 44.4% 30.6%
N 207 44 273
Have in-depth knowledge % 4.9% 6.1% 4.8%
N 35 6 43
  Valid N 718 99 891
Total Sample 730 104 911

Q2. Does your school have a Sex Education/Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) Policy?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
No % 3.6% 2.9% 3.8%
N 26 3 34
Don't know % 2.4% 1.0% 2.2%
N 17 1 20
Yes % 94.0% 96.2% 94.0%
N 678 100 846
  Valid N 721 104 900
Total Sample 730 104 911

Q3. When was the SRE policy last reviewed and updated?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
In the last 6 months % 27.5% 19.0% 26.7%
N 189 19 228
In the last year % 36.0% 51.0% 38.5%
N 247 51 329
In the last three years % 27.7% 26.0% 26.7%
N 190 26 228
More than 3 years ago % 8.9% 4.0% 8.2%
N 61 4 70
  Valid N 687 100 855
Total Sample 730 104 911

Q4: Is the SRE policy part of a broader Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) and Citizenship policy?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
No % 19.6% 10.6% 18.2%
N 137 11 160
Don't know % 4.6% 4.8% 4.8%
N 32 5 42
Yes % 75.9% 84.6% 77.0%
N 531 88 676
  Valid N 700 104 878
Total Sample 730 104 911

Q5: Who was involved in the development of the SRE policy?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
% N % N % N
Don't know 3.9% 28 2.9% 3 4.0% 35
Governors 81.9% 587 80.6% 83 80.4% 712
PSHE coordinator 49.1% 352 84.5% 87 54.5% 483
School Nurse 27.9% 200 40.8% 42 30.0% 266
Parents 31.1% 223 29.1% 30 30.1% 267
LEA adviser 13.9% 100 22.3% 23 15.0% 133
Head 89.5% 642 74.8% 77 88.0% 780
TEachers 84.7% 607 76.7% 79 83.6% 741
Pupils 5.2% 37 11.7% 12 6.4% 57
Other adults in school 14.1% 101 12.6% 13 14.6% 129
Health Promotion Adviser 7.7% 55 13.6% 14 8.7% 77
Other external agency 2.6% 19 7.8% 8 3.6% 32
Other external agency Health Authority 5.3% 1 12.5% 1 6.3% 2
Healthy Schools Standard 15.8% 3     15.6% 5
GP 36.8% 7     21.9% 7
A Pause Team     12.5% 1 9.4% 3
Visiting Speakers     12.5% 1 3.1% 1
Clinic Nurse     12.5% 1 3.1% 1
Diocese / Priest / Vicar 31.6% 6 37.5% 3 31.3% 10
Under Review 10.5% 2 12.5% 1 9.4% 3
Total Sample 100.0% 730 100.0% 104 100.0% 911
N.B. Summary of several items: percentages given with base = total sample

Q6: Which of these groups have been informed about the SRE policy?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
% N % N % N
Don't know 4.5% 32 4.0% 4 4.8% 42
Governors 89.4% 634 91.1% 92 89.1% 780
PSHE coordinator 54.4% 386 81.2% 82 58.3% 510
School Nurse 36.2% 257 57.4% 58 38.7% 339
Parents 70.5% 500 68.3% 69 70.3% 615
LEA adviser 18.8% 133 29.7% 30 20.1% 176
Head 88.0% 624 89.1% 90 88.0% 770
TEachers 89.3% 633 93.1% 94 89.5% 783
Pupils 19.5% 138 46.5% 47 23.4% 205
Other adults in school 30.9% 219 31.7% 32 31.8% 278
Health Promotion Adviser 5.8% 41 12.9% 13 6.6% 58
Other external agency 1.1% 8 4.0% 4 1.8% 16
Total Sample 100.0% 730 100.0% 104 100.0% 911
Other external agency Health Authority 12.5% 1     6.3% 1
Healthy Schools Standard 25.0% 2     25.0% 4
A Pause Team     25.0% 1 6.3% 1
Visiting Speakers 12.5% 1 75.0% 3 25.0% 4
Clinic Nurse         6.3% 1
Diocese / Priest / Vicar 12.5% 1     6.3% 1
Under Review 37.5% 3     25.0% 4
  100.0% 8 100.0% 4 100.0% 16
N.B. Summary of several items: percentages given with base = total sample

Q7: In what ways has your SRE policy been put into practice in the school?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
Formal Sex Education Lessons/Curriculum % 34.9% 28.2% 33.7%
N 170 20 202
PSE/PSHE % 20.5% 49.3% 26.2%
N 100 35 157
Year Groups % 14.6% 5.6% 13.4%
N 71 4 80
In Science % 11.9% 14.1% 11.7%
N 58 10 70
School Nurse talks to Yr.6 % 11.3% 4.2% 10.4%
N 55 3 62
Meeting with Parents % 5.3% 4.2% 5.2%
N 26 3 31
Issues dealt with as they arise % 5.1% 2.8% 5.3%
N 25 2 32
Videos/Pamphlet etc % 5.3% 1.4% 4.5%
N 26 1 27
Students Questions Answered Sensitively % 4.1% 2.8% 4.0%
N 20 2 24
Discussions Officer % 4.3% 1.4% 3.7%
N 21 1 22
School Development Plan/Policy Plan % 3.7% 2.8% 3.3%
N 18 2 20
External Relevant Visitors % 2.9% 5.6% 3.0%
N 14 4 18
In R.E. % 1.8% 8.5% 2.7%
N 9 6 16
Staff Receiving Training % 2.1% 7.0% 2.5%
N 10 5 15
Health Education Work % 2.5%   2.0%
N 12   12
Relationships % 2.1% 1.4% 2.2%
N 10 1 13
Topic Approach % 1.6% 2.8% 1.7%
N 8 2 10
Reviewed Yearly % 1.8% 1.4% 1.7%
N 9 1 10
Talks & Assemblies % 1.4%   1.3%
N 7   8
Short Session Once a Year % 1.4%   1.2%
N 7   7
Letters to Parents % 1.0%   .8%
N 5   5
Citizenship % .6% 1.4% .7%
N 3 1 4
A Pause Team %   4.2% .7%
N   3 4
TA Training % .4%   .3%
N 2   2
Minimal at Parents Request % .4%   .3%
N 2   2
Parental Consent % .4%   .3%
N 2   2
None % .4%   .3%
N 2   2
Care for Early Developers % .2%   .3%
N 1   2
0 % .2%   .2%
N 1   1
Knowledge of Police % .2%   .2%
N 1   1
Friendly Campaign %   1.4% .2%
N   1 1
Governors Receive Report %   1.4% .2%
N   1 1
  % 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
N 487 71 599
Total Sample 730 104 911

Q8: Who delivers SRE in your school?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
% N % N % N
Teacher 93.8% 660 69.0% 69 89.9% 782
Science Teachers 7.5% 53 49.0% 49 14.1% 123
PSHE Teachers 14.2% 100 78.0% 78 24.7% 215
School Nurse 44.2% 311 44.0% 44 43.2% 376
Other external agency 4.4% 31 22.0% 22 7.2% 63
Total Sample 100.0% 730 100.0% 104 100.0% 911
Other external agency: Health Authority     13.6% 3 4.8% 3
Healthy Schools Standard     4.5% 1 6.3% 4
GP 16.1% 5 13.6% 3 14.3% 9
National Companies     4.5% 1 1.6% 1
A Pause Team     18.2% 4 7.9% 5
Visiting Speakers 38.7% 12 40.9% 9 34.9% 22
Clinic Nurse 3.2% 1 9.1% 2 4.8% 3
Life Education Centres 32.3% 10 4.5% 1 17.5% 11
Diocese / Priest / Vicar 3.2% 1 4.5% 1 3.2% 2
LEA Advisors 9.7% 3     4.8% 3
Head Teacher         1.6% 1
Under Review         1.6% 1
Police & Drugs Agency 6.5% 2 4.5% 1 4.8% 3
Care Officer         3.2% 2
Other unspecified 3.2% 1     1.6% 1
  100.0% 31 100.0% 22 100.0% 63
N.B. Summary of several items: percentages given with base = total sample

Q9. Is SRE training included in your school's Professional Development Strategy for Staff?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
No % 24.6% 18.8% 24.2%
N 170 19 208
Don't know % 29.8% 24.8% 28.5%
N 206 25 245
Yes % 45.6% 56.4% 47.3%
N 315 57 406
  Valid N 691 101 859
Total Sample 730 104 911

Q10. How well informed do you feel with regard to your responsibilities for Sex and Relationship Education in the school?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
[Least well informed] % 9.1% 5.0% 8.4%
N 60 5 69
2 % 15.0% 11.9% 15.9%
N 99 12 131
3 % 34.3% 32.7% 33.7%
N 227 33 278
4 % 31.6% 39.6% 31.9%
N 209 40 263
[Most] % 10.1% 10.9% 10.1%
N 67 11 83
  Valid N 662 101 824
Total Sample 730 104 911

Q11a: Type of school?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
% N % N % N
Infant 11.9% 87 1.9% 2 9.9% 89
Junior 11.4% 83 2.9% 3 9.5% 86
Primary 73.7% 538 1.9% 2 59.9% 540
Secondary     97.1% 101 11.2% 101
First 6.3% 46     5.1% 46
Middle 2.2% 16     1.8% 16
Upper     2.9% 3 .3% 3
Sixth-form     1.9% 2 .2% 2
Special .4% 3 1.9% 2 4.4% 40
Independent 1.1% 8 7.7% 8 4.2% 38
Other type of school 1.4% 10 1.9% 2 3.1% 28
Other 0 16.7% 2     9.7% 3
Voluntary Aided 41.7% 5     16.1% 5
City Tech College         3.2% 1
Severe Learning Difficulties         3.2% 1
Grammar     50.0% 1 6.5% 2
Community College     50.0% 1 6.5% 2
Combined         12.9% 4
EBD School         3.2% 1
Nursery 41.7% 5     32.3% 10
Preparatory         3.2% 1
10         3.2% 1
Total Sample 100.0% 730 100.0% 104 100.0% 911
N.B. Summary of several items: percentages given with base = total sample

Q11b. Does your school have a religious foundation?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
Religious foundation C of E % 83.2% 57.1% 80.7%
N 228 8 247
R.C. % 9.5% 21.4% 9.8%
N 26 3 30
Other Christian % 1.1% 7.1% 1.6%
N 3 1 5
Christian undefined % 2.2% 7.1% 3.6%
N 6 1 11
Unspecified % 2.2% 7.1% 2.6%
N 6 1 8
Other % 1.8%   1.6%
N 5   5
  Valid N 274 14 306
Total Sample 730 104 911

Q12. Name of LEA?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
LEA Bath & North East Somerset % 3.6% 3.8% 3.3%
N 26 4 30
Bristol City % 4.0% 4.8% 4.2%
N 29 5 38
North Somerset % 3.6% 4.8% 3.6%
N 26 5 33
South Gloucestershire % 4.3% 3.8% 3.8%
N 31 4 35
Dorset CC % 6.4% 2.9% 5.7%
N 47 3 52
Poole % 1.8% 2.9% 2.0%
N 13 3 18
Bournemouth % 1.1% 3.8% 1.4%
N 8 4 13
Wiltshire CC % 7.4% 6.7% 7.0%
N 54 7 64
Swindon % 2.2% 2.9% 2.2%
N 16 3 20
Devon CC % 13.6% 11.5% 13.1%
N 99 12 119
Plymouth % 4.5% 3.8% 4.4%
N 33 4 40
Torquay % 1.0% 1.9% 1.1%
N 7 2 10
Cornwall CC % 10.7% 9.6% 9.8%
N 78 10 89
Gloucestershire CC % 9.9% 9.6% 9.9%
N 72 10 90
[Not given] % 26.1% 26.9% 28.5%
N 190 28 259
  Valid N 729 104 910
Total Sample 730 104 911

Any other comments on Sex and Relationship Education:
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
Under Review % 32.0% 31.8% 31.5%
N 47 7 58
PSHE as Core Subject % 10.2% 4.5% 9.8%
N 15 1 18
Fully Discussed with Parents % 8.8% 9.1% 9.8%
N 13 2 18
School Well Organised % 9.5% 9.1% 9.2%
N 14 2 17
School Nurse/Health Education Professional % 7.5% 13.6% 8.7%
N 11 3 16
More Information Required % 9.5% 4.5% 8.2%
N 14 1 15
Social Development % 7.5% 9.1% 8.2%
N 11 2 15
No Formal Teaching Desirable % 6.1%   6.0%
N 9   11
More Teaching Required % 5.4% 9.1% 5.4%
N 8 2 10
Limited by Young Age of Pupils % 6.8%   5.4%
N 10   10
Any Students Questions Answered Sensitively % 5.4%   5.4%
N 8   10
Reviewed Yearly % 5.4%   4.3%
N 8   8
Whose Responsibility % 3.4% 9.1% 4.3%
N 5 2 8
Christian Behaviour % 3.4% 9.1% 3.8%
N 5 2 7
Family Values % 2.7% 9.1% 3.8%
N 4 2 7
Further Advice Welcomed % 3.4% 4.5% 3.3%
N 5 1 6
Prefer Not to Teach It % 3.4% 4.5% 3.3%
N 5 1 6
Issues Raised Rather than Taught % 3.4%   2.7%
N 5   5
Questionnaire to Parents for Views % 2.7%   2.2%
N 4   4
School Policy Document % 1.4% 4.5% 1.6%
N 2 1 3
Contraception % 1.4%   1.6%
N 2   3
Mixed Views from Parents % 1.4%   1.6%
N 2   3
High Level Teenage Pregnancy % 1.4%   1.1%
N 2   2
Homosexuality % .7% 4.5% 1.1%
N 1 1 2
More Time for Teaching % .7% 4.5% 1.1%
N 1 1 2
After School Clinic %   9.1% 1.1%
N   2 2
All Information Together % .7%   .5%
N 1   1
Low Teenage Pregnancy %   4.5% .5%
N   1 1
No Sexual Harassment %   4.5% .5%
N   1 1
Parents Responsibility %   4.5% .5%
N   1 1
SRE Made Compulsory % .7%   .5%
N 1   1
Special Attention for at Risk Girls %     .5%
N     1
  % 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
N 147 22 184
Total Sample 730 104 911

 

ORDER publications

  1. SHEU is an independent research, survey and publishing company and the 'Young People into ...' series of reports are based on the work of one of its divisions - The Schools Health Education Unit. The Unit provides reliable baseline data for local needs assessment to inform plans in health, education and care.
  2. The accumulated databank from the hundreds of school surveys we support each year, involving tens of thousands of young people, is a valuable resource of information and provides many opportunities for research. But we caution against simple reporting and interpretation of our figures as being from 'a national survey'.
  3. In 2014 we compared the profile of the schools in our data sets with what we can see in the country as a whole (see link), and we were pleasantly surprised by the similarity.  This confirms what we concluded in 2004 through a similar study: that the SHEU data sets are reasonably well-matched to the national population of schools.