Governors

We have done a variety of customised surveys including the Regional Governors SRE Survey, summarised below.


A report of a survey of Chairs of School Governors carried out in the South-West of England 2002

South-West Regional Health Authority
In association with: Schools Health Education Unit, Exeter

Summary

REGIONAL GOVERNOR SURVEY 2002: SEX AND RELATIONSHIP EDUCATION

South-West Regional Health Authority        Health Development Agency

Summary of findings from a survey of Chairs of School Governors in the South-West of England

A postal survey of chairs of governors of all schools in the South-West was carried out in the Spring of 2002, to determine their awareness of their responsibilities under the new Sex and Relationship Guidance.

The survey was planned and organised by a team of people: Christine MacInnes [Health Development Agency], Dali Sidebottom [Health Promotion Specialist], Brian Mackenzie [South-West Region Teenage Pregnancy Coordinator]. Support was also provided by Simon Goodenough of the National Governor's Council.

The services of the Schools Health Education Unit were used to carry out the survey, and process the resulting data.

A total of 911 questionnaires were returned from 2375 schools contacted by the end of the Spring, when no more were processed. This 38% response rate is quite typical of a postal survey, but is disappointing in that limited confidence can be given to any inferences about the whole population of schools. 97 governors requested further training.

Q1. Is your governing body aware of the contents and implications of the latest 'Sex and Relationship' guidance from the DfES? (July 2000).

18% of respondents said they were not aware of it at all, and a further 47% admitted only a small degree of awareness.

Q2. Does your school have a Sex Education/Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) Policy?

94% had a policy, with similar proportions in schools from the primary and secondary phases.

Q3. When was the SRE policy last reviewed and updated?

27% said that it had been reviewed in the last 6 months, a combined percentage of 55% reviewing it in the last year.

Q4: Is the SRE policy part of a broader Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) and Citizenship policy?

77% declare that their sex education policy is part of a broader approach to PSHE and Citizenship.

Q5: Who was involved in the development of the SRE policy?

The three groups most commonly involved in the development of policy were Headteachers (88%), Teachers (84%) and Governors (80%).

Q6: Which of these groups have been informed about the SRE policy?

From the same list we see the same top three with Headteachers, Teachers and Governors all at nearly 90%. Parents were said to be informed by 70% of schools and pupils by 23% of schools (47% of secondary schools).

Q7: In what ways has your SRE policy been put into practice in the school?

No prompts were given in this question. The most common classes of response were:
34% Formal sex education lessons; 26% Within PSHE (49% for secondary phase schools) ; 13% Programme for particular year groups ; 12% Science lessons ; 10% School nurse talks to Year 6

Q8: Who delivers SRE in your school?

From a list, the most commonly selected items from all schools were:
90% Teachers ; 43% School Nurse ; 25% PSHE teachers (78% in secondary schools) ; 14% Science Teachers (49% in secondary schools) ; 7% External agency (22% in secondary schools)

More schools report using a school nurse in delivery than in developing policy.

Q9. Is SRE training included in your school's Professional Development Strategy for Staff?

47% said yes (57% of secondary schools).

Conclusions and recommendations

Of the respondents, who might be among the more diligent of governors, awareness of recent official Guidance was not good. It may be that key governors were aware of it when they last revised their Sex and Relationship policy, but currently few claim familiarity with the Guidance document, which contains important guidance about confidentiality, dealing with sensitive issues and many other issues.

There is some evidence here of a need for specific Governor training: 97 returns specifically requested further training in this topic.

Pointers for repeating this type of survey are noted in the full report. A copy of the questionnaire with the full results is available on the SHEU website

Full report

 

PSHE: Sex and Relationship Education
Regional Governor Survey Report

SEX AND RELATIONSHIP EDUCATION

A report of a survey of Chairs of School Governors carried out in the South-West of England 2002

South-West Regional Health Authority

In association with:

Schools Health Education Unit, Exeter


REGIONAL GOVERNOR SURVEY 2002: SEX AND RELATIONSHIP EDUCATION

Summary

A postal survey of chairs of governors of all schools in the South-West was carried out in the Spring of 2002, to determine their awareness of their responsibilities under the new Sex and Relationship Guidance.

About a third of those contacted returned a completed survey form.

Of the respondents, who might be among the more diligent of governors, awareness of the Guidance was not good.

A copy of the full results is available on the SHEU website www.sheu.org.uk


Introduction

A postal survey of Chairs of Governors was carried out in the Spring of 2002. The purpose of the survey was:

[*] to determine the awareness of Governors of their responsibilities under the new Sex and Relationship Guidance

The survey was planned and organised by a team of people:

Christine MacInnes [Health Development Agency]

Dali Sidebottom [Health Promotion Specialist ]

Brian Mackenzie [South-West Region Teenage Pregnancy Coordinator]

Support was also provided by Simon Goodenough of the National Governor's Council.

The services of the Schools Health Education Unit were used to carry out the survey, and process the resulting data.

METHODS

Each school received a package for the Chair of Governors containing:

[*] letter from Brian Mackenzie Regional Teenage Pregnancy Co-ordinator

[*] survey questionnaire

[*] freepost envelope for return of questionnaire

[*] freepost reply card

If a reply card had not been received by a week after the deadline given, a reminder letter was sent from the SHEU.

The reply card bore the same address label as was used to send the packages out. It also offered the Chair an opportunity to indicate (a) if they would be prepared to take part in a follow-up telephone survey, and (b) to request further training in this topic.

A total of 911 questionnaires were returned from 2375 schools contacted by the end of the Spring, when no more were processed. This 38% response rate is quite typical of a postal survey, but is disappointing in that limited confidence can be given to any inferences about the whole population of schools.

Points for improvement of methods include:

There were not sufficient spare packs for additional questionnaires, envelopes or reply cards to be sent with the reminder letter.

Several schools receiving a reminder letter complained either that the time given for completion was too short, or that the questionnaire had never been received. The SHEU researcher responsible for managing their end of the project also happens to be a Chair of Governors, and was surprised how late the materials were received. Greater allowance could have been made for the logistics of getting the survey to the right person.

Several schools with pupils only from KS1 or KS2 commented that the survey seemed inappropriate for them. While the letter accompanying the survey was from the Teenage Pregnancy Co-ordinator, none of the questions were irrelevant to the primary phase. Nonetheless one comment received from a Chair was that the survey had not been returned because it was "totally inappropriate for a primary school"; another Chair in a First School observed that "as sex education is not required until ... KS2, your survey did not seem relevant and was placed in file 13!". It is not possible to say how common was this reaction among non-responders, but indicates that the relevance to the primary phase could have been emphasised.

The best excuse for not returning the form was: "your questionnaire provoked a lot of discussion ... and we have decided to revisit this whole area at a meeting later in the year. I regret therefore that it is not possible to answer it at present."

QUESTIONNAIRE CONTENT

The survey booklet contained the following questions:

Q1. Is your governing body aware of the contents and implications of the latest 'Sex and Relationship' guidance from the DfES? (July 2000)

Q2. Does your school have a Sex Education/Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) Policy?

Q3. When was the SRE policy last reviewed and updated?

Q4: Is the SRE policy part of a broader Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) and Citizenship policy?

Q5: Who was involved in the development of the SRE policy?

Q6: Which of these groups have been informed about the SRE policy?

Q7: In what ways has your SRE policy been put into practice in the school?

Q8: Who delivers SRE in your school?

Q9. Is SRE training included in your school's Professional Development Strategy for Staff?

Q10. How well informed do you feel with regard to your responsibilities for Sex and Relationship Education in the school?

Q11a: Type of school?

Q11b. Does your school have a religious foundation?

Q12. Name of LEA?

Any other comments on Sex and Relationship Education.

A copy of the questionnaire is appended, where the options for answering may be seen.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Q1. Is your governing body aware of the contents and implications of the latest 'Sex and Relationship' guidance from the DfES? (July 2000).

18% of respondents said they were not aware of it at all, and a further 47% admitted only a small degree of awareness. Awareness was better among respondents from secondary schools, with "some detail" being claimed by 44% (compared with 29% of respondents from primary schools).

It is the case that every school should have received a copy of the Government's SRE Guidance issued in summer of 2000, and so would have been expected to refer to it in their last review of sex education policy.

Q2. Does your school have a Sex Education/Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) Policy?

94% had a policy, with similar proportions in the primary and secondary phases.

Q3. When was the SRE policy last reviewed and updated?

27% said that it had been reviewed in the last 6 months, a combined percentage of 55% reviewing it in the last year.

All of these schools will have reviewed their policies since Summer 2000.

Q4: Is the SRE policy part of a broader Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) and Citizenship policy?

77% declare that their sex education policy is part of a broader approach to PSHE and Citizenship.

Q5: Who was involved in the development of the SRE policy?

The three groups most commonly involved in the development of policy were Headteachers (88%), Teachers (84%) and Governors (80%).
Technically, sex education policy is a responsibility of the governors and so we might expect this figure to be higher. There are a great number of policies to be adopted by governors, and the details of the sex education policy may have been obscured by memories of the others.
Moreover, the policy for sex education may in the first instance be drafted by a subcommittee or other group, of which the Chair may have little recollection.

Other groups commonly involved included the PSHE Co-ordinator (55%), school nurse (30%) and parents (30%). 15% involved the LEA adviser (22% in secondary schools).

Q6: Which of these groups have been informed about the SRE policy?

From the same list we see the same top three with Headteachers, Teachers and Governors all at nearly 90%.

Parents were said to be informed by 70% of schools and pupils by 23% of schools (47% of secondary schools).

Q7: In what ways has your SRE policy been put into practice in the school?

No prompts were given in this question. The most common classes of response were:

34% Formal sex education lessons

26% Within PSHE (49% for secondary phase schools)

13% Programme for particular year groups

12% Science lessons

10% School nurse talks to Year 6

Q8: Who delivers SRE in your school?

From a list, the most commonly selected items from all schools were:

90% Teachers

43% School Nurse

25% PSHE teachers (78% in secondary schools)

14% Science Teachers (49% in secondary schools)

7% External agency (22% in secondary schools)

More schools report using a school nurse in delivery than in developing policy.

Q9. Is SRE training included in your school's Professional Development Strategy for Staff?

47% said yes (57% of secondary schools).

Q10. How well informed do you feel with regard to your responsibilities for Sex and Relationship Education in the school?

A scale was given from 1 to 5, with 1 being the least well informed. About a third went for the middle point (3), and a further third went for the 'medium-high' fourth point.

This perhaps sits at odds with the limited confidence reported about the Guidance on SRE in Question 1.

Q11a: Type of school?

60% were primary schools and 12% secondary. If we sweep first, junior, and primary schools into a 'primary phase' group, 80% were primary phase and 12% secondary phase with 9% of schools not being readily classed as either.

4% were independent schools and 4% were special schools.

Q11b. Does your school have a religious foundation?

35% of the schools had a religious foundation, of which 81% were Church of England.

Q12. Name of LEA?

The sample came from the following authorities:

LEA : N : % : OS

Bath & North East Somerset : 30 : 5% : 4%

Bournemouth : 13 : 2% : 2%

Bristol City : 38 : 6% : 8%

Cornwall CC : 89 : 14% : 12%

Devon CC : 119 : 18% : 18%

Dorset CC : 52 : 8% : 9%

Gloucestershire CC : 90 : 14% : 14%

North Somerset : 33 : 5% : 4%

Plymouth : 40 : 6% : 5%

Poole : 18 : 3% : 2%

South Gloucestershire : 35 : 5% : 5%

Swindon : 20 : 3% : 3%

Torquay : 10 : 2% : 2%

Wiltshire CC : 64 : 10% : 12%

[Not given] : 260 :

All : 911

This quite closely reflects the composition of the original sample (OS), although Wiltshire governors may have been less keen than Cornwall ones.

Any other comments on Sex and Relationship Education.

The most common classes of response here were:

32% Area under review

10% PSHE as core subject

10% Fully discussed with parents

10% School well organised with regard to SRE

9% Involvement of School Nurse/other Health professional

8% More information required

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

[*] If this type of survey is repeated in the South-West or elsewhere, there are noted above several opportunities for strengthening the approach and content of the questionnaire.

[*] Of the respondents, who might be among the more diligent of governors, awareness of recent official Guidance was not good.

{o} It may be that key governors were aware of it when they last revised their Sex and Relationship policy, but currently few claim familiarity with the document, which contains important guidance about confidentiality, dealing with sensitive issues and many other issues.

[*] There is some evidence here of a need for specific Governor training: 97 returns specifically requested further training in this topic.
 


APPENDIX:

Copy of questionnaire

Descriptive statistics

Results broken down by phase.

Full results

 

Q1. Is your governing body aware of the contents and implications of the latest 'Sex and Relationship' guidance from the DfES? (July 2000)
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
Not aware of it at all % 18.4% 12.1% 17.7%
N 132 12 158
Aware of it to a small degree % 47.9% 37.4% 46.8%
N 344 37 417
Aware of it in some detail % 28.8% 44.4% 30.6%
N 207 44 273
Have in-depth knowledge % 4.9% 6.1% 4.8%
N 35 6 43
  Valid N 718 99 891
Total Sample 730 104 911

Q2. Does your school have a Sex Education/Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) Policy?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
No % 3.6% 2.9% 3.8%
N 26 3 34
Don't know % 2.4% 1.0% 2.2%
N 17 1 20
Yes % 94.0% 96.2% 94.0%
N 678 100 846
  Valid N 721 104 900
Total Sample 730 104 911



Q3. When was the SRE policy last reviewed and updated?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
In the last 6 months % 27.5% 19.0% 26.7%
N 189 19 228
In the last year % 36.0% 51.0% 38.5%
N 247 51 329
In the last three years % 27.7% 26.0% 26.7%
N 190 26 228
More than 3 years ago % 8.9% 4.0% 8.2%
N 61 4 70
  Valid N 687 100 855
Total Sample 730 104 911



Q4: Is the SRE policy part of a broader Personal, Social & Health Education (PSHE) and Citizenship policy?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
No % 19.6% 10.6% 18.2%
N 137 11 160
Don't know % 4.6% 4.8% 4.8%
N 32 5 42
Yes % 75.9% 84.6% 77.0%
N 531 88 676
  Valid N 700 104 878
Total Sample 730 104 911



Q5: Who was involved in the development of the SRE policy?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
% N % N % N
Don't know 3.9% 28 2.9% 3 4.0% 35
Governors 81.9% 587 80.6% 83 80.4% 712
PSHE coordinator 49.1% 352 84.5% 87 54.5% 483
School Nurse 27.9% 200 40.8% 42 30.0% 266
Parents 31.1% 223 29.1% 30 30.1% 267
LEA adviser 13.9% 100 22.3% 23 15.0% 133
Head 89.5% 642 74.8% 77 88.0% 780
TEachers 84.7% 607 76.7% 79 83.6% 741
Pupils 5.2% 37 11.7% 12 6.4% 57
Other adults in school 14.1% 101 12.6% 13 14.6% 129
Health Promotion Adviser 7.7% 55 13.6% 14 8.7% 77
Other external agency 2.6% 19 7.8% 8 3.6% 32
Other external agency Health Authority 5.3% 1 12.5% 1 6.3% 2
Healthy Schools Standard 15.8% 3     15.6% 5
GP 36.8% 7     21.9% 7
A Pause Team     12.5% 1 9.4% 3
Visiting Speakers     12.5% 1 3.1% 1
Clinic Nurse     12.5% 1 3.1% 1
Diocese / Priest / Vicar 31.6% 6 37.5% 3 31.3% 10
Under Review 10.5% 2 12.5% 1 9.4% 3
Total Sample 100.0% 730 100.0% 104 100.0% 911
N.B. Summary of several items: percentages given with base = total sample



Q6: Which of these groups have been informed about the SRE policy?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
% N % N % N
Don't know 4.5% 32 4.0% 4 4.8% 42
Governors 89.4% 634 91.1% 92 89.1% 780
PSHE coordinator 54.4% 386 81.2% 82 58.3% 510
School Nurse 36.2% 257 57.4% 58 38.7% 339
Parents 70.5% 500 68.3% 69 70.3% 615
LEA adviser 18.8% 133 29.7% 30 20.1% 176
Head 88.0% 624 89.1% 90 88.0% 770
TEachers 89.3% 633 93.1% 94 89.5% 783
Pupils 19.5% 138 46.5% 47 23.4% 205
Other adults in school 30.9% 219 31.7% 32 31.8% 278
Health Promotion Adviser 5.8% 41 12.9% 13 6.6% 58
Other external agency 1.1% 8 4.0% 4 1.8% 16
Total Sample 100.0% 730 100.0% 104 100.0% 911
Other external agency Health Authority 12.5% 1     6.3% 1
Healthy Schools Standard 25.0% 2     25.0% 4
A Pause Team     25.0% 1 6.3% 1
Visiting Speakers 12.5% 1 75.0% 3 25.0% 4
Clinic Nurse         6.3% 1
Diocese / Priest / Vicar 12.5% 1     6.3% 1
Under Review 37.5% 3     25.0% 4
  100.0% 8 100.0% 4 100.0% 16
N.B. Summary of several items: percentages given with base = total sample



Q7: In what ways has your SRE policy been put into practice in the school?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
Formal Sex Education Lessons/Curriculum % 34.9% 28.2% 33.7%
N 170 20 202
PSE/PSHE % 20.5% 49.3% 26.2%
N 100 35 157
Year Groups % 14.6% 5.6% 13.4%
N 71 4 80
In Science % 11.9% 14.1% 11.7%
N 58 10 70
School Nurse talks to Yr.6 % 11.3% 4.2% 10.4%
N 55 3 62
Meeting with Parents % 5.3% 4.2% 5.2%
N 26 3 31
Issues dealt with as they arise % 5.1% 2.8% 5.3%
N 25 2 32
Videos/Pamphlet etc % 5.3% 1.4% 4.5%
N 26 1 27
Students Questions Answered Sensitively % 4.1% 2.8% 4.0%
N 20 2 24
Discussions Officer % 4.3% 1.4% 3.7%
N 21 1 22
School Development Plan/Policy Plan % 3.7% 2.8% 3.3%
N 18 2 20
External Relevant Visitors % 2.9% 5.6% 3.0%
N 14 4 18
In R.E. % 1.8% 8.5% 2.7%
N 9 6 16
Staff Receiving Training % 2.1% 7.0% 2.5%
N 10 5 15
Health Education Work % 2.5%   2.0%
N 12   12
Relationships % 2.1% 1.4% 2.2%
N 10 1 13
Topic Approach % 1.6% 2.8% 1.7%
N 8 2 10
Reviewed Yearly % 1.8% 1.4% 1.7%
N 9 1 10
Talks & Assemblies % 1.4%   1.3%
N 7   8
Short Session Once a Year % 1.4%   1.2%
N 7   7
Letters to Parents % 1.0%   .8%
N 5   5
Citizenship % .6% 1.4% .7%
N 3 1 4
A Pause Team %   4.2% .7%
N   3 4
TA Training % .4%   .3%
N 2   2
Minimal at Parents Request % .4%   .3%
N 2   2
Parental Consent % .4%   .3%
N 2   2
None % .4%   .3%
N 2   2
Care for Early Developers % .2%   .3%
N 1   2
0 % .2%   .2%
N 1   1
Knowledge of Police % .2%   .2%
N 1   1
Friendly Campaign %   1.4% .2%
N   1 1
Governors Receive Report %   1.4% .2%
N   1 1
  % 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
N 487 71 599
Total Sample 730 104 911



Q8: Who delivers SRE in your school?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
% N % N % N
Teacher 93.8% 660 69.0% 69 89.9% 782
Science Teachers 7.5% 53 49.0% 49 14.1% 123
PSHE Teachers 14.2% 100 78.0% 78 24.7% 215
School Nurse 44.2% 311 44.0% 44 43.2% 376
Other external agency 4.4% 31 22.0% 22 7.2% 63
Total Sample 100.0% 730 100.0% 104 100.0% 911
Other external agency: Health Authority     13.6% 3 4.8% 3
Healthy Schools Standard     4.5% 1 6.3% 4
GP 16.1% 5 13.6% 3 14.3% 9
National Companies     4.5% 1 1.6% 1
A Pause Team     18.2% 4 7.9% 5
Visiting Speakers 38.7% 12 40.9% 9 34.9% 22
Clinic Nurse 3.2% 1 9.1% 2 4.8% 3
Life Education Centres 32.3% 10 4.5% 1 17.5% 11
Diocese / Priest / Vicar 3.2% 1 4.5% 1 3.2% 2
LEA Advisors 9.7% 3     4.8% 3
Head Teacher         1.6% 1
Under Review         1.6% 1
Police & Drugs Agency 6.5% 2 4.5% 1 4.8% 3
Care Officer         3.2% 2
Other unspecified 3.2% 1     1.6% 1
  100.0% 31 100.0% 22 100.0% 63
N.B. Summary of several items: percentages given with base = total sample



Q9. Is SRE training included in your school's Professional Development Strategy for Staff?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
No % 24.6% 18.8% 24.2%
N 170 19 208
Don't know % 29.8% 24.8% 28.5%
N 206 25 245
Yes % 45.6% 56.4% 47.3%
N 315 57 406
  Valid N 691 101 859
Total Sample 730 104 911



Q10. How well informed do you feel with regard to your responsibilities for Sex and Relationship Education in the school?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
[Least well informed] % 9.1% 5.0% 8.4%
N 60 5 69
2 % 15.0% 11.9% 15.9%
N 99 12 131
3 % 34.3% 32.7% 33.7%
N 227 33 278
4 % 31.6% 39.6% 31.9%
N 209 40 263
[Most] % 10.1% 10.9% 10.1%
N 67 11 83
  Valid N 662 101 824
Total Sample 730 104 911



Q11a: Type of school?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
% N % N % N
Infant 11.9% 87 1.9% 2 9.9% 89
Junior 11.4% 83 2.9% 3 9.5% 86
Primary 73.7% 538 1.9% 2 59.9% 540
Secondary     97.1% 101 11.2% 101
First 6.3% 46     5.1% 46
Middle 2.2% 16     1.8% 16
Upper     2.9% 3 .3% 3
Sixth-form     1.9% 2 .2% 2
Special .4% 3 1.9% 2 4.4% 40
Independent 1.1% 8 7.7% 8 4.2% 38
Other type of school 1.4% 10 1.9% 2 3.1% 28
Other 0 16.7% 2     9.7% 3
Voluntary Aided 41.7% 5     16.1% 5
City Tech College         3.2% 1
Severe Learning Difficulties         3.2% 1
Grammar     50.0% 1 6.5% 2
Community College     50.0% 1 6.5% 2
Combined         12.9% 4
EBD School         3.2% 1
Nursery 41.7% 5     32.3% 10
Preparatory         3.2% 1
10         3.2% 1
Total Sample 100.0% 730 100.0% 104 100.0% 911
N.B. Summary of several items: percentages given with base = total sample



Q11b. Does your school have a religious foundation?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
Religious foundation C of E % 83.2% 57.1% 80.7%
N 228 8 247
R.C. % 9.5% 21.4% 9.8%
N 26 3 30
Other Christian % 1.1% 7.1% 1.6%
N 3 1 5
Christian undefined % 2.2% 7.1% 3.6%
N 6 1 11
Unspecified % 2.2% 7.1% 2.6%
N 6 1 8
Other % 1.8%   1.6%
N 5   5
  Valid N 274 14 306
Total Sample 730 104 911



Q12. Name of LEA?
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
LEA Bath & North East Somerset % 3.6% 3.8% 3.3%
N 26 4 30
Bristol City % 4.0% 4.8% 4.2%
N 29 5 38
North Somerset % 3.6% 4.8% 3.6%
N 26 5 33
South Gloucestershire % 4.3% 3.8% 3.8%
N 31 4 35
Dorset CC % 6.4% 2.9% 5.7%
N 47 3 52
Poole % 1.8% 2.9% 2.0%
N 13 3 18
Bournemouth % 1.1% 3.8% 1.4%
N 8 4 13
Wiltshire CC % 7.4% 6.7% 7.0%
N 54 7 64
Swindon % 2.2% 2.9% 2.2%
N 16 3 20
Devon CC % 13.6% 11.5% 13.1%
N 99 12 119
Plymouth % 4.5% 3.8% 4.4%
N 33 4 40
Torquay % 1.0% 1.9% 1.1%
N 7 2 10
Cornwall CC % 10.7% 9.6% 9.8%
N 78 10 89
Gloucestershire CC % 9.9% 9.6% 9.9%
N 72 10 90
[Not given] % 26.1% 26.9% 28.5%
N 190 28 259
  Valid N 729 104 910
Total Sample 730 104 911



Any other comments on Sex and Relationship Education:
  Primary or mainly KS1/2 Secondary or mainly KS3/4 All
Under Review % 32.0% 31.8% 31.5%
N 47 7 58
PSHE as Core Subject % 10.2% 4.5% 9.8%
N 15 1 18
Fully Discussed with Parents % 8.8% 9.1% 9.8%
N 13 2 18
School Well Organised % 9.5% 9.1% 9.2%
N 14 2 17
School Nurse/Health Education Professional % 7.5% 13.6% 8.7%
N 11 3 16
More Information Required % 9.5% 4.5% 8.2%
N 14 1 15
Social Development % 7.5% 9.1% 8.2%
N 11 2 15
No Formal Teaching Desirable % 6.1%   6.0%
N 9   11
More Teaching Required % 5.4% 9.1% 5.4%
N 8 2 10
Limited by Young Age of Pupils % 6.8%   5.4%
N 10   10
Any Students Questions Answered Sensitively % 5.4%   5.4%
N 8   10
Reviewed Yearly % 5.4%   4.3%
N 8   8
Whose Responsibility % 3.4% 9.1% 4.3%
N 5 2 8
Christian Behaviour % 3.4% 9.1% 3.8%
N 5 2 7
Family Values % 2.7% 9.1% 3.8%
N 4 2 7
Further Advice Welcomed % 3.4% 4.5% 3.3%
N 5 1 6
Prefer Not to Teach It % 3.4% 4.5% 3.3%
N 5 1 6
Issues Raised Rather than Taught % 3.4%   2.7%
N 5   5
Questionnaire to Parents for Views % 2.7%   2.2%
N 4   4
School Policy Document % 1.4% 4.5% 1.6%
N 2 1 3
Contraception % 1.4%   1.6%
N 2   3
Mixed Views from Parents % 1.4%   1.6%
N 2   3
High Level Teenage Pregnancy % 1.4%   1.1%
N 2   2
Homosexuality % .7% 4.5% 1.1%
N 1 1 2
More Time for Teaching % .7% 4.5% 1.1%
N 1 1 2
After School Clinic %   9.1% 1.1%
N   2 2
All Information Together % .7%   .5%
N 1   1
Low Teenage Pregnancy %   4.5% .5%
N   1 1
No Sexual Harassment %   4.5% .5%
N   1 1
Parents Responsibility %   4.5% .5%
N   1 1
SRE Made Compulsory % .7%   .5%
N 1   1
Special Attention for at Risk Girls %     .5%
N     1
  % 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%
N 147 22 184
Total Sample 730 104 911

Topics: 

Comments about SHEU

"The Unit is to be congratulated in preparing ... material of the highest standard and worthy of wide dissemination." National Association for Environmental Education

National Association for Environmental Education

"...the only question to cause a problem was 'has everyone got a pen?" Supervisor's notes following a school survey

Supervisor's Notes

"One year (following the SHEU survey) responses from our Year 4 cohort caused us concern, so we put in place a number of team building, motivational projects. We then assessed their effectiveness by requesting the SHEU questionnaires for these pupils as Year 5's."

Learning Mentor

"I have valued greatly the work I have done with the team in Exeter, it has been a highlight of my years here." Health Promotion Specialist

Health Promotion Specialist

"The Unit has a unique historical and contemporary archive of young people." Prof. Ted Wragg 1938-2005

Prof Ted Wragg, 1938-2005

I would be extremely interested to see the results as I know how useful this information has been to the other schools in the
borough

Headteacher

"We're very happy to commission another survey from you. Our colleagues in School Improvement are dead keen to work with us on this. During our last LA Inspection, we were flagged from our Tellus data as having a bullying problem. We could demonstrate with our SHEU data - which had a much better sample size and coverage of the authority - that we did not have the problem they suggested. The Inspectors went away happy and we are definitely surveying again with SHEU."

Local Authority Senior Adviser

"We have never consulted our young people like this before. The survey makes a great contribution to our 'best value' planning." Sports Development Officer

Sports Development Officer

"The Schools Health Education Unit has been a unique inspiration to all of us. For me, as I have worked in the many different areas of the NHS, the SHEU, its principles and your determination have always been a cornerstone in what a health promoting service should be about."
PCT Performance Manager paying tribute to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

PCT Performance Manager

"You have made a fantastic contribution to children’s health education and promotion. I am personally grateful to you for helping to kickstart my research career." Prof. Neil Armstrong tribute to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Prof Neil Armstrong

"The survey reports have been used to inform commissioning at specific commissioning groups. They are also being used within our Extended Schools Clusters and to inform The Annual Public Health and the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment." Programme Manager - Young People

"...the most comprehensive health education survey."

Daily Telegraph

"I really think that the HRBQ is a wonderful piece of work in terms of getting useful information for so many different organisations in one go." Healthy Children's Research and Statistics Officer

Research and Statistics Officer

"Thanks for presenting the survey to local schools this morning, I just wanted to thank you for such interesting and thought-provoking information.  
I’m really glad we were able to take part - the information (particularly headline data and differences) will support us to have some really interesting questions with the Year group as a whole about the sense they’re making of this; what they think it might mean in terms of changes they might make, and what they need to support them in this."

Deputy Headteacher

"It's good to talk with you again - we used so much of those data and did so much with it in schools - we really got the place buzzing!"

Consultant in Public Health

We were all very impressed with the spreadsheet and can see that an incredible amount of work has gone into creating this!

Health Improvement Specialist

"The data for (us) are very useful ... This is especially important when evaluating the impact of interventions regarding alcohol or other areas, as the survey data are likely to provide an earlier indication than routine data sources."

Specialist Registrar in Public Health

"The (named) Children and Young People's Partnership has benefitted from the results of the SHEU survey locally for many years now, and we should like to continue to do so in future."

Consultant in Public Health Medicine

"You and the team have the evidence to show how young people's behaviour has or hasn't changed over time." 
Tribute from a Health Education Co-ordinator to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Health Education Co-ordinator

"The system works and I find quite a lot of it useful in my work. I've also recommended it to others."

Teenage Pregnancy Manager

"Please send an additional copy of our report - it is the most requested and borrowed item in the whole library." Health Promotion Unit

Health Promotion Unit

"Brilliant - thank you Angela. As always you and your team are so proficient at getting our requests dealt with so promptly - it is a real pleasure to work with such a great organisation."

Health Improvement Adviser

"The Health Related Behaviour Survey is an incredibly useful resource for (us) as it provides schools, with invaluable data which can inform curriculum content, methods of lesson delivery and empower schools to better meet the needs of their pupils."

Health Education Advisor

"The children found the survey very interesting and enjoyed doing it." Class Teacher

Class teacher

"Many thanks for all of the fantastic information that you have sent to me over the years, it has really helped me to plan relevant courses for my students to follow and to help me to focus on the needs of the students I teach."

PSHE teacher

"The Schools Health Education Unit has gained a reputation as one of the most reliable sources of information about young people's health." BBC

BBC

"We are planning next year's programmes around this information." Health Education Adviser

Health Education Adviser

"I have never looked at myself in this way before." Pupil

Pupil

"The Schools Health Education Unit is the jewel in the crown of the Health Education Authority." Major General Sir John Acland 1928 - 2006

Major General Sir John Acland

"The data from last time were spot-on and we have done lots of work with it. We are very keen to repeat the survey." Headteacher

Headteacher

"I would like to say that this survey was very useful and made me realise things about PE and health that I had never realised before......Food at school is groovy, especially if your school does Jamie Olivers School Dinners. Viva apples and thanks for the survey." Female pupil, 13 yrs old

Female pupil, 13yrs

“(The SHEU survey) was very, very useful. It gave us reassurance we weren’t missing a trick. For example not many pupils in the sample year groups were taking illegal drugs, which re-enforced our opinions. But the survey also raised issues and flagged some things up. We discovered that some of our girls weren’t eating enough – the percentage of girls in our school not eating lunch the day before the survey was higher than the county average. There were other concerns too, specifically around cigarettes, alcohol and attendance.
The school used this data and took a number of actions to address it. More female peer mentors were put in place and the school asked NEXUS (the Extended Schools service) for help, so they developed a programme for girls which addressed their eating patterns, healthy eating, sex education and self-esteem issues.
We ran an anti-bullying group for Year 9 as a preventative measure, based upon data provided by our current Year 10 students.
The travel data revealed that a high number of pupils took the car to school so we involved the BIKE-IT scheme who ran assemblies, brought in their bikes (including one with a pedal-powered smoothie maker!), and raised awareness of health and green issues.
The information about how happy the students were with their lives raised some concerns as far fewer girls were as happy as the boys, so work was done around developing aspirations, role-models and self-esteem."        
 

Deputy Head, Secondary School

"The service you provide is of national significance." Health Development Agency

Health Development Agency

"As a result of the survey we reviewed and amended PSHE schemes of work, we are currently working on a "Green Travel Plan", a morning breakfast club was established and we further developed 6th Form mentoring."

Health Education Coordinator

"Within the curriculum, we are part of the Healthy Schools programme - and the local, Director of Public Health Award. We cover many facets of health from emotional intelligence to safety education and our very strong, Anti-Bullying and Child Protection programmes. You can imagine our delight when the Local Authority and our school nurse made the following comments after we took part in the regional Schools Health Education Unit Survey: " Head Teacher.
“This was an amazing set of outcomes and really good evidence that (your school) is doing a wonderful job in prioritizing the health and well-being of its pupils … Well done to staff, governors and parents for all your work on this through the Director of Public Health award and other strategies. It is very clear that pupils feel happy, safe and involved at the school and your caring ethos shines through this data.”
Healthy Schools Coorduinator.

 

Headteacher & Healthy Schools Coordinator

"We never make a move without looking at these excellent reports." Public Health Consultant

Public Health Consultant

"This is an excellent way of keeping up to date belt and braces style."

School Drugs Advisor

"I would like to say how much we appreciated the work you and your team have put in to this project, a big thank you for the excellent reports that you have completed on our behalf." Assistant Director of Public Health

Assistant Director of Public Health

"Thank you from my staff to you and all your staff. The speed of 'turn-around' of the questionnaires is outstanding in anyone's terms." Headteacher

Headteacher

(Our) Senior team were very enthused with the rich source of data provided within the reports (and thought that the analyses including within the appendices section of the main reports were really interesting).

Health Improvement Specialist (Children, Schools and Families)

"We would like to take part in the next ECM survey. We have found the data produced invaluable for supporting evidence in our SEF etc."

School Vice Principal

"Just to say a huge thank you for all your efforts in helping us with the Health survey amongst pupils. It has provided us with significant data which will be used across the school to help us improve. It helped us to obtain a healthy schools standard as well. I hope we can make this an annual feature as we can track the changing health of our pupils." Headteacher

Headteacher

"Our use of the Health-Related Behaviour Questionnaire was commended as part of our accreditation for the National Healthy Schools Scheme." Headteacher

"This week I have been working on a major strategy for service design -- it is easy to get solely focussed on hospitals, performance targets, and work force planning -- all very important; but at the same the needs of young people and how we need to work across agencies to address the health needs of today and tomorrow must be recognised. SHEU is founded to do just this."

PCT Performance Manager

"Over the last twenty years you have achieved much. The surveys and subsequent reports have painted the clearest picture we have of what young people are doing and what they think." Tribute from OFSTED to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

OFSTED

"I really appreciate the professional service which SHEU offers.  We have had a great experience working with Angela on the school surveys." 

Health Improvement Specialist

Any comments on specific survey questions that may have caused difficulty?
Pupils at our primary school found the questionnaire very easy to understand and most of them completed the questions in less than 45min.

Teacher

"You have often stood alone against the media who were often looking for the sensational headline. I have noticed an important change: the media now look out for and report very fairly and fully on the reports from the team." 
Tributes from a Health Education Advisor to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Health Education Advisor

"We use the data to inform whole school practice: Pastoral programmes for target groups of pupils; Items for discussion with School Council; Information to help us achieve the Healthy School gold standard; To develop and dicuss with pupils our Anti-Bullying Policy; Targeted whole class sessions with the Police Community Support Officers; To share pupil perceptions of all aspects of their school life with parents, staff and governers." 

Learning Mentor

"Thank you very much, David, for another excellent survey.  We look forward to receiving our reports."

Healthy Schools Co-ordinator

"SHEU data proved the best source of the kind of information we were looking for (...) to provide research support to the National Healthy Schools Programme." 

Department of Health

"The Unit produces an invaluable body of knowledge... providing exceptional information across time and throughout the country." Kelloggs

Kelloggs

"Many thanks for a major contribution to the health of children in the UK and elsewhere over many years and putting in place the continuation of the Unit." Tribute from a Director of Public Health to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Director of Public Health

"On behalf of all the health promoters in Scotland I would like to say a big thank to you and your colleagues for your excellent work over the years. This includes not only your survey work but your role as a visiting examiner in Scotland and adviser on course development."
Tribute from a Health Commissioner to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Health Commissioner

"As a Deputy Head in a large secondary school I was involved in taking part in a city wide health and wellbeing survey over a period of six years. Completing the survey every two years grew in importance year on year, with the final cycle having a major impact on our SDP, PHSE curriculum, Ofsted outcomes and governor understanding.
Over the six year period we moved from a small sample in two tutor groups filling in a paper survey to two year groups completing an online survey. The reports produced give graphical analysis of a wide range of issues. As a result of the survey we increased the number of PSHE workshop days for students to address issues such as smoking, drug and alcohol awareness, anti-bullying workshops. The surveys helped Governors make a positive informed decision to allow Brook Advisory Clinic nurses on site to support students.
As a result of taking part and using the evidence provided we were able to offer more support for students which had a direct impact on improved attendance and outcomes."

Deputy Head Secondary School

"Over the last twenty years you have achieved much. The surveys and subsequent reports have painted the clearest picture we have of what young people are doing and what they think." OFSTED 1998

OFSTED

"Your work in developing the Health Related Behaviour Survey was ground breaking and has continued to evolve." Tribute from a Director of Public Health to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

"I very much value the contribution the Health Related Behaviour Survey has made to the public health agenda and feel confident it will continue to do so." Tribute from a Director of Public Health to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Director of Public Health

"We were talking about (the SHEU survey) data at our recent NSCoPSE Conference, for PSHE advisers and consultants. It would be really helpful if some of this powerful data and the trends could be shared in the consultation around the PSHE Review. Colleagues shared their very positive experiences of (the SHEU survey). It provides excellent evidence of behaviour change for children and young people and of the impact of PSHE and wider interventions."

Personal and Social Development Consultant

"Every school involved in the National Healthy School programme should start with an HRBQ survey." Health Education Co-ordinator

Health Education Co-ordinator

"Many thanks to SHEU for your excellent professional support over the years."

PSHE teacher

"You have made a truly significant contribution to health education and health promotion of young people in, not only England, but all over the United Kingdom and beyond." Colleague from NHS Scotland paying tribute to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

NHS Scotland

"I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your work regarding writing and compiling the sex education survey. The survey was well executed and the schools have found their individual reports very helpful. The results of the survey have enabled the Local Campaign Group to justify the need for young men's campaigns and given us invaluable insight as to the thoughts and experiences of this target group."

Teenage Pregnancy Strategy Manager

 “The (SHEU survey) helped us to prioritise where we needed to be in terms of PSHE education. We delivered assemblies based on the evidence as well as curriculum development, and dealt with whole school issues – particularly in regard to pastoral care. The answers received to the question on the survey “Who are you most likely to approach if you needed help” worried staff as “teacher” was not a popular answer. Subsequently the staff asked themselves why this had happened and what needed to be done to address the issue. There was more emphasis on wider aspects of PSHE education delivery, which needed more attention.

To summarise, the (SHEU survey) allows the PSHE department to assess the impact of teaching and learning and modify future lessons accordingly. It allows our school to look at whole school issues such as the extent to which the pastoral care system is meeting the needs of our pupils. It helps us to do need analysis of our pupils. It helps to provide important evidence for SEF / the extent to which we are meeting wellbeing indicators / National Healthy School standards.”  

Secondary School Head