Education and Health journal Archive

Education and Health articles: complete archive

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SEARCH by Year (eg. type 2011 and all articles published in 2011 will appear). SEARCH by Volume and Issue: Volume 1 was published in 1983. Most years have 4 issues. In 2013 it is volume 31. To read all articles in vol. 31: issue 1 - type 311 etc.

Randhawa,G 1997. Fighting the organ transplant crisis: what can schools do?
In the event of a tragedy, a family may be left with a very difficult and confusing decision. Education and Health 15(1),14-15. PDF

Griffiths,M 1997. Video game: the good news: examining the more positive aspects of playing computer games. Education and Health 15(1),10-12. PDF

Balding,J 1996. Primary children are active, stay up late and get on with Mum and Dad. Education and Health 14(5),72-75. PDF

Rogers,B 1996. Mediation has certainly worked for us - Highfield has become a better place. Education and Health 14(1),1-4. PDF

Regis,D 1996. Peer tutoring seems to work - but why?. Education and Health 13(5),75-78. PDF

Woolmark,G 1996. East Yorkshire reaches the parts other schemes miss: Using a survey of 'smoking' information to boost the Health Award. Education and Health 13(5),73-74. PDF

Hunt,J 1996. Teenage sexual health: Do school nurses hold the key?. Education and Health 13(5),69-72. PDF

Fisher,S Balding,J 1996. Under-16s find the Lottery a good gamble. Education and Health 13(5),65-68. PDF

Balding,J Regis,D 1996. More alcohol down fewer throats?. Education and Health 13(4),61-63. PDF

Beavet,T 1996. Parents, schools and sex education. Education and Health 13(4),59-60. PDF

Barnett,P 1996. D.A.R.E. - Drug Abuse Resistance Education. Education and Health 13(4),56-58. PDF

Balding,J 1996. Starting at home: bringing environment into the curriculum - . Education and Health 13(4),52-56. PDF

Mathie,E Ford,N Blacksell,S Inman,M 1996. Sea, Sand and Safer Sex Messages: 25% said they had formed at least one new sexual relationship while on holiday.. Education and Health 13(4),49-51. PDF

Balding,J 1996. The young people that are afraid of going to school: Fear of bullying affects more than a quarter of 12-13 year olds. Education and Health 14(1),5-13. PDF

Griffiths,M Perkins,G 1996. Bullies, victims and the code of silence: 'Almost four in every five children reported being bullied to some degree'. Education and Health 14(2),17-21. PDF

Regis,D 1996. Saving the environment: switch off or turn-off?. Education and Health 14(5),65-71. PDF

Balding,J 1996. Last Orders: the first step towards an effective alcohol programme?. Education and Health 14(4),60-63. PDF

Sutherland,L 1996. Nit combs: naturally the best?. Education and Health 14(4),57-59. PDF

Muirden,J 1996. Biting the elephant: A report on 'Bridging The Gap' a meeting for school staff and health care professionals. Education and Health 14(4),53-56. PDF

Johnston,J 1996. Promoting a whole- school approach to bullying. Education and Health 14(4),49-52. PDF

Hudson,F Wesy,J 1996. Needing to be heard: the young person's agenda. Education and Health 14(3),43-47. PDF

Syson-Nibbs,L 1996. Sun safety education in schools. Education and Health 14(3),37-41. PDF

Balding,J 1996. Young People in 1995 - data from 23,918 young people. Education and Health 14(3),33-36. PDF

Regis,D 1996. Is it ever right to break the law?. Education and Health 14(2),27-30. PDF

Balding,J 1996. Scraping off the Tipp-Ex: We must resist pressures to include questions that are not appropriate to ask young people. Education and Health 14(2),22-26. PDF

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Comments about SHEU

"The data for (us) are very useful ... This is especially important when evaluating the impact of interventions regarding alcohol or other areas, as the survey data are likely to provide an earlier indication than routine data sources."

Specialist Registrar in Public Health

"The data from the 2018/19 survey is still in heavy use here, the physical activity related findings were pivotal in changing the relevant strategy recently to target less active groups like girls towards the end of secondary school, and I’ve three fairly hefty jobs on the to-do list that will use the data with other sources to identify target schools for mental health and physical activity projects, and another looking at community safety. I call it the gift that keeps giving and that certainly seems to be the case!"

Senior Public Health Specialist (Intelligence)

"The survey reports have been used to inform commissioning at specific commissioning groups. They are also being used within our Extended Schools Clusters and to inform The Annual Public Health and the Joint Strategic Needs Assessment." Programme Manager - Young People

“(The SHEU survey) was very, very useful. It gave us reassurance we weren’t missing a trick. For example not many pupils in the sample year groups were taking illegal drugs, which re-enforced our opinions. But the survey also raised issues and flagged some things up. We discovered that some of our girls weren’t eating enough – the percentage of girls in our school not eating lunch the day before the survey was higher than the county average. There were other concerns too, specifically around cigarettes, alcohol and attendance.
The school used this data and took a number of actions to address it. More female peer mentors were put in place and the school asked NEXUS (the Extended Schools service) for help, so they developed a programme for girls which addressed their eating patterns, healthy eating, sex education and self-esteem issues.
We ran an anti-bullying group for Year 9 as a preventative measure, based upon data provided by our current Year 10 students.
The travel data revealed that a high number of pupils took the car to school so we involved the BIKE-IT scheme who ran assemblies, brought in their bikes (including one with a pedal-powered smoothie maker!), and raised awareness of health and green issues.
The information about how happy the students were with their lives raised some concerns as far fewer girls were as happy as the boys, so work was done around developing aspirations, role-models and self-esteem."        
 

Deputy Head, Secondary School

"On behalf of all the health promoters in Scotland I would like to say a big thank to you and your colleagues for your excellent work over the years. This includes not only your survey work but your role as a visiting examiner in Scotland and adviser on course development."
Tribute from a Health Commissioner to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Health Commissioner

We were all very impressed with the spreadsheet and can see that an incredible amount of work has gone into creating this!

Health Improvement Specialist

"The Schools Health Education Unit is the jewel in the crown of the Health Education Authority." Major General Sir John Acland 1928 - 2006

Major General Sir John Acland

"Brilliant - thank you Angela. As always you and your team are so proficient at getting our requests dealt with so promptly - it is a real pleasure to work with such a great organisation."

Health Improvement Adviser

"Every school involved in the National Healthy School programme should start with an HRBQ survey." Health Education Co-ordinator

Health Education Co-ordinator

"We have never consulted our young people like this before. The survey makes a great contribution to our 'best value' planning." Sports Development Officer

Sports Development Officer