Education and Health journal Archive

Education and Health articles: complete archive

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SEARCH by Year (eg. type 2011 and all articles published in 2011 will appear). SEARCH by Volume and Issue: Volume 1 was published in 1983. Most years have 4 issues. In 2013 it is volume 31. To read all articles in vol. 31: issue 1 - type 311 etc.

Annemien Haveman-Nies, Marieke CE Battjes-Fries, Wieteke M van Wijhe-van Zadelhoff and Jeltje H Snel, 2017. No change no progress: why school-based nutrition education programmes should continue to evolve
. Education and Health 35(4),  PDF

Amy Basford, Hannah Fawcett and Jeremy Oldfield, 2017. Exploring first year psychology students’ experiences of their transition from pre-tertiary to university education. Education and Health 35(4),  PDF

Sophie McPhee, 2017. Why there was no depression amongst cavemen- the approach of Queen Mary’s Grammar School to the delivery of PSHE. Education and Health 35(4),  PDF

Rebecah MacGilleEathain, 2017. Conducting sex and relationships research with young people in secondary schools: the use of clickers as an interactive and confidential data collection method. Education and Health 35(4),  PDF

Michelle Jayman, Maddie Ohl, Pauline Fox and Bronach Hughes, 2017. Beyond evidence-based interventions: implementing an integrated approach to promoting pupil mental wellbeing in schools with Pyramid club. Education and Health 35(4), 36-38. PDF

John Rees, 2017. SMSC, wellbeing and school improvement – the links and opportunities. Education and Health 35(3), 63-67. PDF

Emma L Davies and Fiona A I Matley, 2017. Research on school-based interventions needs more input from teachers. Education and Health 35(3), 60-62. PDF

David Regis, 2017. Vulnerable pupils and substance use: an analysis of SHEU survey data. Education and Health 35(3), 58-59. PDF

Christine Williams, Alessandra Sarcona and Dara Dirhan, 2017. Teaching Media Literacy and Ad Deconstruction for Making Healthier Food Choices. Education and Health 35(3), 53-55. PDF

Claire Kelly, 2017. Mindfulness in Schools Project. Education and Health 35(2), 36-38. PDF

Simon B Cooper and Daniela Simson, 2017. Move more, Learn more? Exercise and Cognitive Function in Adolescents. Education and Health 35(3), 53-55. PDF

Mark D Griffiths and Daria J Kuss, 2017. Adolescent social media addiction (revisited). Education and Health 35(3), 49-52. PDF

Michelle Cook, 2017. Using Problem-Based Learning to Teach about Nutrition. Education and Health 35(2), 39-47. PDF

 

Gay Rabie, Jean Evers, Veronica Olsen and Kevin Byrne, 2017. The Healthy Futures project. Education and Health 35(2), 31-34. PDF

Tania Hart, 2017. How do teenage school children, experiencing significant emotional mental health difficulties, perceive they can be better supported at school? Education and Health 35(2), 26-30. PDF

Natasha Chamberlain, 2017. Solihull Emotional Health and Wellbeing in Schools Project 2014-2016. Education and Health 35(1), 6-10. PDF

David Regis, 2017. Trends and research in young people's alcohol and substance use. Education and Health 35(1), 3-5. PDF

Ed Cope and Andy Foster, 2017. A critical discussion of what approach coaches should adopt when coaching children. Education and Health 35(1), 20-23. PDF

Seamus Whitty and Tom Farrelly, 2017. What’s Fun Got to Do with It? – Engaging Young People in a School-Based Wellbeing Programme. Education and Health 35(1), 13-19. PDF

Amanda Mason-Jones, 2017. Keeping girls at school may reduce teenage pregnancy and STIs – but sex education doesn't. Education and Health 35(1), 11-12. PDF

Comments about SHEU

"We're very happy to commission another survey from you. Our colleagues in School Improvement are dead keen to work with us on this. During our last LA Inspection, we were flagged from our Tellus data as having a bullying problem. We could demonstrate with our SHEU data - which had a much better sample size and coverage of the authority - that we did not have the problem they suggested. The Inspectors went away happy and we are definitely surveying again with SHEU."

Local Authority Senior Adviser

"We use the data to inform whole school practice: Pastoral programmes for target groups of pupils; Items for discussion with School Council; Information to help us achieve the Healthy School gold standard; To develop and dicuss with pupils our Anti-Bullying Policy; Targeted whole class sessions with the Police Community Support Officers; To share pupil perceptions of all aspects of their school life with parents, staff and governers." 

Learning Mentor

"The Unit is to be congratulated in preparing ... material of the highest standard and worthy of wide dissemination." National Association for Environmental Education

National Association for Environmental Education

"The system works and I find quite a lot of it useful in my work. I've also recommended it to others."

Teenage Pregnancy Manager

"Brilliant - thank you Angela. As always you and your team are so proficient at getting our requests dealt with so promptly - it is a real pleasure to work with such a great organisation."

Health Improvement Adviser

"I really appreciate the professional service which SHEU offers.  We have had a great experience working with Angela on the school surveys." 

Health Improvement Specialist

"Within the curriculum, we are part of the Healthy Schools programme - and the local, Director of Public Health Award. We cover many facets of health from emotional intelligence to safety education and our very strong, Anti-Bullying and Child Protection programmes. You can imagine our delight when the Local Authority and our school nurse made the following comments after we took part in the regional Schools Health Education Unit Survey: " Head Teacher.
“This was an amazing set of outcomes and really good evidence that (your school) is doing a wonderful job in prioritizing the health and well-being of its pupils … Well done to staff, governors and parents for all your work on this through the Director of Public Health award and other strategies. It is very clear that pupils feel happy, safe and involved at the school and your caring ethos shines through this data.”
Healthy Schools Coorduinator.

 

Headteacher & Healthy Schools Coordinator

"Thank you very much, David, for another excellent survey.  We look forward to receiving our reports."

Healthy Schools Co-ordinator

"One year (following the SHEU survey) responses from our Year 4 cohort caused us concern, so we put in place a number of team building, motivational projects. We then assessed their effectiveness by requesting the SHEU questionnaires for these pupils as Year 5's."

Learning Mentor

"The credit goes to you for the fabulous information the survey yields!"

Assistant Director Schools and SEN