Education and Health journal Archive

Education and Health articles: complete archive

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SEARCH by Year (eg. type 2011 and all articles published in 2011 will appear). SEARCH by Volume and Issue: Volume 1 was published in 1983. Most years have 4 issues. In 2013 it is volume 31. To read all articles in vol. 31: issue 1 - type 311 etc.

Annemien Haveman-Nies, Marieke CE Battjes-Fries, Wieteke M van Wijhe-van Zadelhoff and Jeltje H Snel, 2017. No change no progress: why school-based nutrition education programmes should continue to evolve
. Education and Health 35(4),  PDF

Amy Basford, Hannah Fawcett and Jeremy Oldfield, 2017. Exploring first year psychology students’ experiences of their transition from pre-tertiary to university education. Education and Health 35(4),  PDF

Sophie McPhee, 2017. Why there was no depression amongst cavemen- the approach of Queen Mary’s Grammar School to the delivery of PSHE. Education and Health 35(4),  PDF

Rebecah MacGilleEathain, 2017. Conducting sex and relationships research with young people in secondary schools: the use of clickers as an interactive and confidential data collection method. Education and Health 35(4),  PDF

Michelle Jayman, Maddie Ohl, Pauline Fox and Bronach Hughes, 2017. Beyond evidence-based interventions: implementing an integrated approach to promoting pupil mental wellbeing in schools with Pyramid club. Education and Health 35(4), 36-38. PDF

John Rees, 2017. SMSC, wellbeing and school improvement – the links and opportunities. Education and Health 35(3), 63-67. PDF

Emma L Davies and Fiona A I Matley, 2017. Research on school-based interventions needs more input from teachers. Education and Health 35(3), 60-62. PDF

David Regis, 2017. Vulnerable pupils and substance use: an analysis of SHEU survey data. Education and Health 35(3), 58-59. PDF

Christine Williams, Alessandra Sarcona and Dara Dirhan, 2017. Teaching Media Literacy and Ad Deconstruction for Making Healthier Food Choices. Education and Health 35(3), 53-55. PDF

Claire Kelly, 2017. Mindfulness in Schools Project. Education and Health 35(2), 36-38. PDF

Simon B Cooper and Daniela Simson, 2017. Move more, Learn more? Exercise and Cognitive Function in Adolescents. Education and Health 35(3), 53-55. PDF

Mark D Griffiths and Daria J Kuss, 2017. Adolescent social media addiction (revisited). Education and Health 35(3), 49-52. PDF

Michelle Cook, 2017. Using Problem-Based Learning to Teach about Nutrition. Education and Health 35(2), 39-47. PDF

 

Gay Rabie, Jean Evers, Veronica Olsen and Kevin Byrne, 2017. The Healthy Futures project. Education and Health 35(2), 31-34. PDF

Tania Hart, 2017. How do teenage school children, experiencing significant emotional mental health difficulties, perceive they can be better supported at school? Education and Health 35(2), 26-30. PDF

Natasha Chamberlain, 2017. Solihull Emotional Health and Wellbeing in Schools Project 2014-2016. Education and Health 35(1), 6-10. PDF

David Regis, 2017. Trends and research in young people's alcohol and substance use. Education and Health 35(1), 3-5. PDF

Ed Cope and Andy Foster, 2017. A critical discussion of what approach coaches should adopt when coaching children. Education and Health 35(1), 20-23. PDF

Seamus Whitty and Tom Farrelly, 2017. What’s Fun Got to Do with It? – Engaging Young People in a School-Based Wellbeing Programme. Education and Health 35(1), 13-19. PDF

Amanda Mason-Jones, 2017. Keeping girls at school may reduce teenage pregnancy and STIs – but sex education doesn't. Education and Health 35(1), 11-12. PDF

Comments about SHEU

"As a Deputy Head in a large secondary school I was involved in taking part in a city wide health and wellbeing survey over a period of six years. Completing the survey every two years grew in importance year on year, with the final cycle having a major impact on our SDP, PHSE curriculum, Ofsted outcomes and governor understanding.
Over the six year period we moved from a small sample in two tutor groups filling in a paper survey to two year groups completing an online survey. The reports produced give graphical analysis of a wide range of issues. As a result of the survey we increased the number of PSHE workshop days for students to address issues such as smoking, drug and alcohol awareness, anti-bullying workshops. The surveys helped Governors make a positive informed decision to allow Brook Advisory Clinic nurses on site to support students.
As a result of taking part and using the evidence provided we were able to offer more support for students which had a direct impact on improved attendance and outcomes."

Deputy Head Secondary School

"The Unit has a unique historical and contemporary archive of young people." Prof. Ted Wragg 1938-2005

Prof Ted Wragg, 1938-2005

Many thanks to you and your team for turning this around so quickly.
We really appreciate it, and also your extra support with the administration this time.

PSHE Lead Advisor

"You and the team have the evidence to show how young people's behaviour has or hasn't changed over time." 
Tribute from a Health Education Co-ordinator to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Health Education Co-ordinator

"The Unit is to be congratulated in preparing ... material of the highest standard and worthy of wide dissemination." National Association for Environmental Education

National Association for Environmental Education

“(The SHEU survey) was very, very useful. It gave us reassurance we weren’t missing a trick. For example not many pupils in the sample year groups were taking illegal drugs, which re-enforced our opinions. But the survey also raised issues and flagged some things up. We discovered that some of our girls weren’t eating enough – the percentage of girls in our school not eating lunch the day before the survey was higher than the county average. There were other concerns too, specifically around cigarettes, alcohol and attendance.
The school used this data and took a number of actions to address it. More female peer mentors were put in place and the school asked NEXUS (the Extended Schools service) for help, so they developed a programme for girls which addressed their eating patterns, healthy eating, sex education and self-esteem issues.
We ran an anti-bullying group for Year 9 as a preventative measure, based upon data provided by our current Year 10 students.
The travel data revealed that a high number of pupils took the car to school so we involved the BIKE-IT scheme who ran assemblies, brought in their bikes (including one with a pedal-powered smoothie maker!), and raised awareness of health and green issues.
The information about how happy the students were with their lives raised some concerns as far fewer girls were as happy as the boys, so work was done around developing aspirations, role-models and self-esteem."        
 

Deputy Head, Secondary School

At the time, the results were very useful and the feedback report very useful and insightful. Significant changes will occur in our schools health and wellbeing provision next year and conducting another survey will certainly help me to ensure I am planning effectively for the needs of our pupils.

Head of Health and Wellbeing

I would be extremely interested to see the results as I know how useful this information has been to the other schools in the
borough

Headteacher

"Within the curriculum, we are part of the Healthy Schools programme - and the local, Director of Public Health Award. We cover many facets of health from emotional intelligence to safety education and our very strong, Anti-Bullying and Child Protection programmes. You can imagine our delight when the Local Authority and our school nurse made the following comments after we took part in the regional Schools Health Education Unit Survey: " Head Teacher.
“This was an amazing set of outcomes and really good evidence that (your school) is doing a wonderful job in prioritizing the health and well-being of its pupils … Well done to staff, governors and parents for all your work on this through the Director of Public Health award and other strategies. It is very clear that pupils feel happy, safe and involved at the school and your caring ethos shines through this data.”
Healthy Schools Coorduinator.

 

Headteacher & Healthy Schools Coordinator

"Many thanks to SHEU for your excellent professional support over the years."

PSHE teacher