Education and Health journal Archive

Education and Health articles: complete archive

Click on keywords to filter: Addiction / Adolescence / Alcohol / Asthma / Bereavement / Bullying / Cancer / Counselling / Dental Health / Diet / Drama / Drugs / Education / Emotional Health / Employment / Environment / Family / Food / Further Education / Gaming & gambling / Health / Health Education / Health Promotion / Healthy Schools / HIV/AIDS / HRBQ (Health-Related Behaviour Questionnaire) / Immunisation / Information Technology / International / Just a Tick / Moral Education / Parenthood / Physical Activity / PRI/SEC / Primary / PSHE (Personal, Social and Health Education) / Refugees / Road Safety / Safety / School Nurse / Secondary / Self-esteem / Sex Education / SHEU / Skin Cancer / Smoking / Sociology / Special NeedsTeacher Training / Very Young People series / Young People series

Or use the search box below: [A new search will override any earlier searches]

SEARCH by Year (eg. type 2011 and all articles published in 2011 will appear). SEARCH by Volume and Issue: Volume 1 was published in 1983. Most years have 4 issues. In 2013 it is volume 31. To read all articles in vol. 31: issue 1 - type 311 etc.

SHEU. 2016. Recent additions to the research resource. Education and Health 34(4). PDF

Natasha Chamberlain, 2017. Solihull Emotional Health and Wellbeing in Schools Project 2014-2016. Education and Health 35(1), 6-10. PDF

Stacey Williams and Jo Cranwell. 2016. Engaging young people with film to encourage them and their peers not to smoke – The Cut Films project Education and Health 34(4). PDF

Amanda McCloat and Martin Caraher. 2016. Home Economics as a food education intervention: lessons from the Irish secondary education context. Education and Health 34(4). PDF

Vicki Dawson. 2016. Supporting young people with sleep issues to meet their full potential. Education and Health 34(4). PDF

Emma Dobson. 2016. For successful Sex and Relationships Education, effective communication is key; but with whom? Education and Health 34(4). PDF

Poh Chua Siah. 2016. Grit as a Predictor of Adolescents’ Mobile Phone Addiction. Education and Health 34(4). PDF

Anna Lavis, 2016. Social media and anorexia: A qualitative analysis of #proana. Education and Health 34(2), 57-62. PDF

Sarah Lyles, 2016. Effective PSHE – Ensuring positive outcomes for children and young people. Education and Health 34(2), 53-56.  PDF

Maurice Coles, 2016. ‘An old intelligence of the heart’: Towards the compassionate school. Education and Health 34(2), 47-52.  PDF

Rick Bradley and Chloe Still, 2016. ‘Mind and Body’ - Early intervention for young people at risk of self-harm. Education and Health 34(2), 42-46.  PDF

Tina Rae, 2016. Introducing the topic of self-harm in schools – developing an educational and preventative support intervention. Education and Health 34(2), 35-41.  PDF

Sue Astin, 2016. Building resilience – improving pupil’s emotional health and wellbeing through the Enhanced Healthy Schools model. Education and Health 34(2), 31-34. PDF

Janet Currie, 2016. Using sporting themes to engage young males in health education lessons. Education and Health 34(2), 25-30.   PDF

SHEU, 2016. Recent additions to the free research resource that supports those concerned with the health and wellbeing of children and young people. Education and Health 34(3), 84. PDF
 

Claas Wegner, Caroline Seide and Carolin Zehne, 2016. Sexuality Education in Germany - Example of a Comprehensive, Learner-Centered Teaching Unit. Education and Health 34(3), 79-83. PDF

Rebecca K. Britt and Brian C. Britt, 2016. The need to develop health campaigns for obtaining the HPV vaccine in rural and medically-underserved college campuses. Education and Health 34(3), 74-78. PDF

Mark D. Griffiths, Rahim Benrazavi and Misha Teimouri, 2016. Parental mediation and adolescent screen time: A brief overview. Education and Health 34(3), 70-73. PDF

Paul Yau-ho Wong, Doris Pui-wah Cheng and Edith Yuk-lan Leung, 2016. Implementing Smoking Prevention Education in Early Childhood: Views from Parents and Early Childhood Educators. Education and Health 34(3), 65-69. PDF

Jennifer Fane and Samantha Schulz. 2016. 'Re'-Learning health: Challenges in teaching health literacy and implications for the new national Australian HPE curriculum. Education and Health 34(1),10-14.  PDF

 

Jane Petch. 2016. Health Promotion in Primary Schools. Education and Health 34(1),15-20.  PDF

Andrew B. Evans and David T. Evans. 2016. Do safeguarding concerns deter young people’s access to condoms? Issues about integrating sexual health services online. Education and Health 34(1),3-8.  PDF

David Regis. 2016. School nurses still do it in schools! Education and Health 34(1),21-22.  PDF

David McGeorge. 2016. Developing a free research resource to support those concerned with the health and wellbeing of children and young people. Education and Health 34(1),9.  PDF

Comments about SHEU

"The Schools Health Education Unit is the jewel in the crown of the Health Education Authority." Major General Sir John Acland 1928 - 2006

Major General Sir John Acland

"The Schools Health Education Unit has been a unique inspiration to all of us. For me, as I have worked in the many different areas of the NHS, the SHEU, its principles and your determination have always been a cornerstone in what a health promoting service should be about."
PCT Performance Manager paying tribute to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

PCT Performance Manager

 “The (SHEU survey) helped us to prioritise where we needed to be in terms of PSHE education. We delivered assemblies based on the evidence as well as curriculum development, and dealt with whole school issues – particularly in regard to pastoral care. The answers received to the question on the survey “Who are you most likely to approach if you needed help” worried staff as “teacher” was not a popular answer. Subsequently the staff asked themselves why this had happened and what needed to be done to address the issue. There was more emphasis on wider aspects of PSHE education delivery, which needed more attention.

To summarise, the (SHEU survey) allows the PSHE department to assess the impact of teaching and learning and modify future lessons accordingly. It allows our school to look at whole school issues such as the extent to which the pastoral care system is meeting the needs of our pupils. It helps us to do need analysis of our pupils. It helps to provide important evidence for SEF / the extent to which we are meeting wellbeing indicators / National Healthy School standards.”  

Secondary School Head

"SHEU data proved the best source of the kind of information we were looking for (...) to provide research support to the National Healthy Schools Programme." 

Department of Health

"This is an excellent way of keeping up to date belt and braces style."

School Drugs Advisor

"The data from last time were spot-on and we have done lots of work with it. We are very keen to repeat the survey." Headteacher

Headteacher

Any comments on specific survey questions that may have caused difficulty?
All questions are clearly worded and easy to answer

Class teacher

"Many thanks for a major contribution to the health of children in the UK and elsewhere over many years and putting in place the continuation of the Unit." Tribute from a Director of Public Health to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Director of Public Health

"We have never consulted our young people like this before. The survey makes a great contribution to our 'best value' planning." Sports Development Officer

Sports Development Officer

"Over the last twenty years you have achieved much. The surveys and subsequent reports have painted the clearest picture we have of what young people are doing and what they think." OFSTED 1998

OFSTED