Education and Health journal Archive

Education and Health articles: complete archive

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SEARCH by Year (eg. type 2011 and all articles published in 2011 will appear). SEARCH by Volume and Issue: Volume 1 was published in 1983. Most years have 4 issues. In 2013 it is volume 31. To read all articles in vol. 31: issue 1 - type 311 etc.

Balding,J 1998. The underweight girls who want to lose more: Body image was still high on the 'worry' agenda in 1997. Young People in 1997 - data from 37,538 young people. Education and Health 16(2),17-24. PDF

Griffiths,M 1997. Instant- win promotions: part of the 'gambling' environment?. Education and Health 15(4),62-63. PDF

Fox,K 1997. Active living: A prescription for lifelong health and well-being. Education and Health 15(4),56-59. PDF

Forsyth,T 1997. Under-age sales: Making retailers count the cost. Education and Health 15(4),53-55. PDF

Balding,J Gimber,P Wise,A 1997. A quarter of Year 7 boys want to cycle to school: A recent survey may help to promote county-wide initiatives to encourage safe alternatives to car travel. Education and Health 15(4),49-52. PDF

Regis,D 1997. The importance of caring for pets:Implications of the 'Tamagotchi' craze. Education and Health 15(3),60-61. PDF

Whelan,S Culver,J 1997. Teaching young people how to say No: the DARE drugs education resource may be failing. Education and Health 15(3),43-46. PDF

Kendall,L 1997. Something in the air - but what does it mean?: young people with asthma are unclear about air quality. Education and Health 15(3),39-42. PDF

Griffiths,M 1997. Are virtual pets more demanding than the real thing?: 'Bereavement' counselling and Tamagotchi. Education and Health 15(3),37-38. PDF

Clark,J Baluch,B 1997. Hospital education: effective or disruptive?: A pioneering study uncovers mixed attitudes towards children's schooling while in hospital. Education and Health 15(3),33-36. PDF

Bagnall,P 1997. School nurses are a soft touch for cuts: fighting the assumption that 'no evidence means no benefit'. Education and Health 15(2),29-31. PDF

Macfarlane,A 1997. Parents and teenagers- three dozen suggestions for having an easier ride. Education and Health 15(2),26-28. PDF

Balding,J 1997. Young people in 1986 and 1996: spot the difference - data from 22,067 young people. Education and Health 15(2),1-25. PDF

Harris,B 1997. Preparing for the GCSE: doing justice to themselves.
The author was not prepared for the extent to which non-academic issues intruded into the pupils' lives. Education and Health 15(1),6-8. PDF

Balding,J 1997. Young people and alcohol: its use and abuse. The Unit's latest 'alcohol' survey examines (among other things) amounts, attitudes, and aggression. Education and Health 15(1),1-5. PDF

Randhawa,G 1997. Fighting the organ transplant crisis: what can schools do?
In the event of a tragedy, a family may be left with a very difficult and confusing decision. Education and Health 15(1),14-15. PDF

Griffiths,M 1997. Video game: the good news: examining the more positive aspects of playing computer games. Education and Health 15(1),10-12. PDF

Comments about SHEU

"As a Deputy Head in a large secondary school I was involved in taking part in a city wide health and wellbeing survey over a period of six years. Completing the survey every two years grew in importance year on year, with the final cycle having a major impact on our SDP, PHSE curriculum, Ofsted outcomes and governor understanding.
Over the six year period we moved from a small sample in two tutor groups filling in a paper survey to two year groups completing an online survey. The reports produced give graphical analysis of a wide range of issues. As a result of the survey we increased the number of PSHE workshop days for students to address issues such as smoking, drug and alcohol awareness, anti-bullying workshops. The surveys helped Governors make a positive informed decision to allow Brook Advisory Clinic nurses on site to support students.
As a result of taking part and using the evidence provided we were able to offer more support for students which had a direct impact on improved attendance and outcomes."

Deputy Head Secondary School

"The Schools Health Education Unit has gained a reputation as one of the most reliable sources of information about young people's health." BBC

BBC

"Over the last twenty years you have achieved much. The surveys and subsequent reports have painted the clearest picture we have of what young people are doing and what they think." Tribute from OFSTED to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

OFSTED

"I would like to say that this survey was very useful and made me realise things about PE and health that I had never realised before......Food at school is groovy, especially if your school does Jamie Olivers School Dinners. Viva apples and thanks for the survey." Female pupil, 13 yrs old

Female pupil, 13yrs

Any comments on specific survey questions that may have caused difficulty?
Pupils at our primary school found the questionnaire very easy to understand and most of them completed the questions in less than 45min.

Teacher

"I really appreciate the professional service which SHEU offers.  We have had a great experience working with Angela on the school surveys." 

Health Improvement Specialist

"The Unit has a unique historical and contemporary archive of young people." Prof. Ted Wragg 1938-2005

Prof Ted Wragg, 1938-2005

"On behalf of all the health promoters in Scotland I would like to say a big thank to you and your colleagues for your excellent work over the years. This includes not only your survey work but your role as a visiting examiner in Scotland and adviser on course development."
Tribute from a Health Commissioner to John Balding, presented at his retirement lunch, May 2005

Health Commissioner

I would be extremely interested to see the results as I know how useful this information has been to the other schools in the
borough

Headteacher

“(The SHEU survey) was very, very useful. It gave us reassurance we weren’t missing a trick. For example not many pupils in the sample year groups were taking illegal drugs, which re-enforced our opinions. But the survey also raised issues and flagged some things up. We discovered that some of our girls weren’t eating enough – the percentage of girls in our school not eating lunch the day before the survey was higher than the county average. There were other concerns too, specifically around cigarettes, alcohol and attendance.
The school used this data and took a number of actions to address it. More female peer mentors were put in place and the school asked NEXUS (the Extended Schools service) for help, so they developed a programme for girls which addressed their eating patterns, healthy eating, sex education and self-esteem issues.
We ran an anti-bullying group for Year 9 as a preventative measure, based upon data provided by our current Year 10 students.
The travel data revealed that a high number of pupils took the car to school so we involved the BIKE-IT scheme who ran assemblies, brought in their bikes (including one with a pedal-powered smoothie maker!), and raised awareness of health and green issues.
The information about how happy the students were with their lives raised some concerns as far fewer girls were as happy as the boys, so work was done around developing aspirations, role-models and self-esteem."        
 

Deputy Head, Secondary School