Education and Health journal Archive

Education and Health articles: complete archive

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SEARCH by Year (eg. type 2011 and all articles published in 2011 will appear). SEARCH by Volume and Issue: Volume 1 was published in 1983. Most years have 4 issues. In 2013 it is volume 31. To read all articles in vol. 31: issue 1 - type 311 etc.

Emmett,D 1994. On drugs: It's not our problem any more. Education and Health 12(5),78-79. PDF

Balding,J 1994. Weighing the worry, measuring the mind: Is health just one more thing to worry about?. Education and Health 12(5),73-76. PDF

Biddle,S 1994. Exercise is good for the mind!: Even though there is no research evidence that competitive sports build 'character'
Education and Health    12(5),70-72 PDF

Armstrong,N Welsman,J 1994. Today's children: Fitness, fatness, and physical activity. Education and Health 12(5),65-69. PDF

Balding,J 1994. Young people and drug-taking: facts and trends. Education and Health 12(4),49-62. PDF

Balding,J 1994. Sensible drinking: The Unit's response to the Government's review. Education and Health 12(3),46-47. PDF

Regis,D Balding,J 1994. A look at the wheezers and dosers: 'the school with the most dosers does not always have the most wheezers'. Education and Health 12(3),41-45. PDF

Doak,C 1994. A County policy for managing asthma in schools: How a 'risk management' approach led to a county-wide initiative. Education and Health 12(3),37-40. PDF

Lee,J 1994. Asthma medication: What about the 70% who forget?. Education and Health 12(3),33-36. PDF

Griffiths,M 1994. Computer games: Harmless or addictive?. Education and Health 12(2),28-30. PDF

Simpson,A West,H 1994. West Sussex school nurses teach the teachers: towards a better understanding of health-related issues. Education and Health 12(2),25-27. PDF

Pye,T 1994. Safe as houses? A sniff of danger for 3,000 primary pupils: a broad-based safety curriculum. Education and Health 12(2),21-25. PDF

Dyer,A 1994. Seeking a sense of place: 'Children are by nature romantics, until their imagination and creativity are suborned by the pressures of the dominant rationalist world.'. Education and Health 12(2),17-20. PDF

Maskell,P 1994. 'Period pains' in a mixed school: "Boys can make you feel that periods are something awful". Education and Health 12(1),6-9. PDF

Hollins,P 1994. Safer school journeys: a 'self-help' approach: Schools help to put road safety 'on the map' for the community. Education and Health 12(1),1-5. PDF

Balding,J 1994. Young People in 1993 - data from 29,074 young people. Education and Health 12(1),10-15. PDF

MacGregor,I Balding,J Regis,D 1994. Young people and tooth-brushing: when and why?. Education and Health 11(5),72-76. PDF

Balding,J 1994. Not GCSE but CCSE!: A new cross-curricular sex education pack, developed by teachers and pupils, with evaluation components and a method of overall monitoring. Education and Health 11(5),70-71. PDF

Comments about SHEU

 “The (SHEU survey) helped us to prioritise where we needed to be in terms of PSHE education. We delivered assemblies based on the evidence as well as curriculum development, and dealt with whole school issues – particularly in regard to pastoral care. The answers received to the question on the survey “Who are you most likely to approach if you needed help” worried staff as “teacher” was not a popular answer. Subsequently the staff asked themselves why this had happened and what needed to be done to address the issue. There was more emphasis on wider aspects of PSHE education delivery, which needed more attention.

To summarise, the (SHEU survey) allows the PSHE department to assess the impact of teaching and learning and modify future lessons accordingly. It allows our school to look at whole school issues such as the extent to which the pastoral care system is meeting the needs of our pupils. It helps us to do need analysis of our pupils. It helps to provide important evidence for SEF / the extent to which we are meeting wellbeing indicators / National Healthy School standards.”  

Secondary School Head

(Our) Senior team were very enthused with the rich source of data provided within the reports (and thought that the analyses including within the appendices section of the main reports were really interesting).

Health Improvement Specialist (Children, Schools and Families)

"...the most comprehensive health education survey."

Daily Telegraph

I think the HRBQ is an absolutely wonderful, informative tool and I am keen to really encourage schools/other relevant partners (as appropriate) to utilise this invaluable data to encourage voice of the child, and subsequently contribute to shaping priorities and services.

Senior Health Improvement Practitioner (Children and Young People)

"Brilliant - thank you Angela. As always you and your team are so proficient at getting our requests dealt with so promptly - it is a real pleasure to work with such a great organisation."

Health Improvement Adviser

Please could our College be part of the SHEU survey this academic year? We did it in 2016 and 2017 and found it incredibly informative and it helped us shape our PSHE provision.

Assistant Principal

"It's good to talk with you again - we used so much of those data and did so much with it in schools - we really got the place buzzing!"

Consultant in Public Health

...our analyst here in Public Health- is beside himself with excitement about all the juicy data pouring in...he can't wait to get his hands on it!!!!
He is happier than I have seen him for years.

Public Health Principal

"As a Deputy Head in a large secondary school I was involved in taking part in a city wide health and wellbeing survey over a period of six years. Completing the survey every two years grew in importance year on year, with the final cycle having a major impact on our SDP, PHSE curriculum, Ofsted outcomes and governor understanding.
Over the six year period we moved from a small sample in two tutor groups filling in a paper survey to two year groups completing an online survey. The reports produced give graphical analysis of a wide range of issues. As a result of the survey we increased the number of PSHE workshop days for students to address issues such as smoking, drug and alcohol awareness, anti-bullying workshops. The surveys helped Governors make a positive informed decision to allow Brook Advisory Clinic nurses on site to support students.
As a result of taking part and using the evidence provided we were able to offer more support for students which had a direct impact on improved attendance and outcomes."

Deputy Head Secondary School

"This is an excellent way of keeping up to date belt and braces style."

School Drugs Advisor