Education and Health journal Archive

Education and Health articles: complete archive

Click on keywords to filter: Addiction / Adolescence / Alcohol / Asthma / Bereavement / Bullying / Cancer / Counselling / Dental Health / Diet / Drama / Drugs / Education / Emotional Health / Employment / Environment / Family / Food / Further Education / Gaming & gambling / Health / Health Education / Health Promotion / Healthy Schools / HIV/AIDS / HRBQ (Health-Related Behaviour Questionnaire) / Immunisation / Information Technology / International / Just a Tick / Moral Education / Parenthood / Physical Activity / PRI/SEC / Primary / PSHE (Personal, Social and Health Education) / Refugees / Road Safety / Safety / School Nurse / Secondary / Self-esteem / Sex Education / SHEU / Skin Cancer / Smoking / Sociology / Special NeedsTeacher Training / Very Young People series / Young People series

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SEARCH by Year (eg. type 2011 and all articles published in 2011 will appear). SEARCH by Volume and Issue: Volume 1 was published in 1983. Most years have 4 issues. In 2013 it is volume 31. To read all articles in vol. 31: issue 1 - type 311 etc.

Balding,J 1993. Young People in 1992 - data from 20,218 young people. Education and Health 11(2),23-29. PDF

Elliott,H 1992. Developing a 'parental survival kit,14+'. Education and Health 10(5),73-78. PDF

Lucas,B 1992. School grounds can seriously damage your health!. Education and Health 10(5),70-72. PDF

Evans,Z 1992. Playtime: when the learning really starts. Education and Health 10(5),65-69. PDF

Carruthers,P 1992. 4 or 5 children in every class.... Education and Health 10(4),59-62. PDF

MacDonald,T 1992. Seeking a non-smoking lifestyle in an East London youth club. Education and Health 10(4),55-58. PDF

Jones,M 1992. It pays to use peer leaders!. Education and Health 10(4),49-54. PDF

Balding,J 1992. Ticking the topics: did the school get them right?. Education and Health 10(3),43-46. PDF

Balding,J 1992. Young people in 1991 - data from 23,928 young people. Education and Health 10(3),33-42. PDF

Phelps,F et al. 1992. So you really think you understand sex?. Education and Health 10(2),27-31. PDF

Jones,M 1992. Teenage pregnancies: who is responsible?. Education and Health 10(2),21-26. PDF

Lee,J 1992. A question of balance. Education and Health 10(2),17-20. PDF

Thomas,G 1992. A national award for the AIDS exchange game. Education and Health 10(1),9-10. PDF

Balding,JW Bish,D 1992. How we do it... alcohol education in 48 schools. Education and Health 10(1),1-8. PDF

Combes,G Iqbal,S 1992. 'Special needs' health guidelines have pointers for all pupils. Education and Health 10(1),14-15. PDF

Brown,T 1992. CG5: The good, the bad, and the guidance. Education and Health 10(1),11-13. PDF

Comments about SHEU

"I would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your work regarding writing and compiling the sex education survey. The survey was well executed and the schools have found their individual reports very helpful. The results of the survey have enabled the Local Campaign Group to justify the need for young men's campaigns and given us invaluable insight as to the thoughts and experiences of this target group."

Teenage Pregnancy Strategy Manager

"Just to say a huge thank you for all your efforts in helping us with the Health survey amongst pupils. It has provided us with significant data which will be used across the school to help us improve. It helped us to obtain a healthy schools standard as well. I hope we can make this an annual feature as we can track the changing health of our pupils." Headteacher

Headteacher

 “The (SHEU survey) helped us to prioritise where we needed to be in terms of PSHE education. We delivered assemblies based on the evidence as well as curriculum development, and dealt with whole school issues – particularly in regard to pastoral care. The answers received to the question on the survey “Who are you most likely to approach if you needed help” worried staff as “teacher” was not a popular answer. Subsequently the staff asked themselves why this had happened and what needed to be done to address the issue. There was more emphasis on wider aspects of PSHE education delivery, which needed more attention.

To summarise, the (SHEU survey) allows the PSHE department to assess the impact of teaching and learning and modify future lessons accordingly. It allows our school to look at whole school issues such as the extent to which the pastoral care system is meeting the needs of our pupils. It helps us to do need analysis of our pupils. It helps to provide important evidence for SEF / the extent to which we are meeting wellbeing indicators / National Healthy School standards.”  

Secondary School Head

"One year (following the SHEU survey) responses from our Year 4 cohort caused us concern, so we put in place a number of team building, motivational projects. We then assessed their effectiveness by requesting the SHEU questionnaires for these pupils as Year 5's."

Learning Mentor

Please could our College be part of the SHEU survey this academic year? We did it in 2016 and 2017 and found it incredibly informative and it helped us shape our PSHE provision.

Assistant Principal

"Many thanks to SHEU for your excellent professional support over the years."

PSHE teacher

“(The SHEU survey) was very, very useful. It gave us reassurance we weren’t missing a trick. For example not many pupils in the sample year groups were taking illegal drugs, which re-enforced our opinions. But the survey also raised issues and flagged some things up. We discovered that some of our girls weren’t eating enough – the percentage of girls in our school not eating lunch the day before the survey was higher than the county average. There were other concerns too, specifically around cigarettes, alcohol and attendance.
The school used this data and took a number of actions to address it. More female peer mentors were put in place and the school asked NEXUS (the Extended Schools service) for help, so they developed a programme for girls which addressed their eating patterns, healthy eating, sex education and self-esteem issues.
We ran an anti-bullying group for Year 9 as a preventative measure, based upon data provided by our current Year 10 students.
The travel data revealed that a high number of pupils took the car to school so we involved the BIKE-IT scheme who ran assemblies, brought in their bikes (including one with a pedal-powered smoothie maker!), and raised awareness of health and green issues.
The information about how happy the students were with their lives raised some concerns as far fewer girls were as happy as the boys, so work was done around developing aspirations, role-models and self-esteem."        
 

Deputy Head, Secondary School

"The Schools Health Education Unit has gained a reputation as one of the most reliable sources of information about young people's health." BBC

BBC

"The Unit has a unique historical and contemporary archive of young people." Prof. Ted Wragg 1938-2005

Prof Ted Wragg, 1938-2005

We were all very impressed with the spreadsheet and can see that an incredible amount of work has gone into creating this!

Health Improvement Specialist